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Sleep deprivation induces brain region-specific decreases in glutathione levels

D'Almeida, Vânia1,2; Lobo, Letícia L.1; Hipólide, Débora C.1; de Oliveira, Allan C.2; Nobrega, José N.3; Tufilk, Sérgio1,4

Sleep

RATS were deprived of sleep for 96 h by the platform technique and total glutathione (GSHτ) levels were measured in seven different brain areas. Glutathione levels were found to be significantly reduced in the hypothalamus of sleep-deprived animals when compared with large platform (−18%) or home cage (−31%) controls. Deprived rats also had reduced GSHπ levels in thalamus compared with home cage controls only. Glutathione levels did not differ among the three groups in any of the other brain areas examined. These results indicate that specific brain areas may be differentially susceptible to oxidative stress after sleep deprivation. The apparent vulnerability of the hypothalamus to these effects may contribute to the functional effects of sleep deprivation.

1department of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Rua Napoleão de Barros, 925 CEP 04024-002, São Paulo, Brazil

2department of Pediatrics, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Rua Napoleão de Barros, 925 CEP 04024-002, São Paulo, Brazil

3Clarke Institute of Psychiatry, Toronto, Canada

4Corresponding Author: Sérgio Tufilk

Website publication 12 August 1998

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: This work was supported by Associação Fundo de Incentivo a Psicofarmacologia (AFIP) of Brazil. A.C.O is a recipient of a fellowship from PIBIC/Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Cientifico e Tecnológico (CNPq) of Brazil.

Received 25 May 1998; accepted 9 June 1998

© Lippincott-Raven Publishers.