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Simulation in an Undergraduate Nursing Pharmacology Course: A Pilot Study

Tinnon, Elizabeth; Newton, Rebecca

doi: 10.1097/01.NEP.0000000000000098
Research Briefs

This study examined the effectiveness of simulation as a method of teaching pharmacological concepts to nursing students; perceptions of satisfaction with simulation as a teaching strategy were also evaluated. Second-semester juniors participated in three simulations and completed the National League for Nursing Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning Questionnaire and the Student Evaluation of Educational Quality Survey; a control group received traditional lectures. A unit exam on anticoagulant therapy content was administered to measure effectiveness. Findings support that simulation is as effective as traditional lecture for an undergraduate pharmacology course.

About the Authors Elizabeth Tinnon, PhD, RN, CNE, is assistant professor, College of Nursing, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg. Rebecca Newton, DNP, RN, is assistant professor, College of Nursing, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg. For more information, contact Dr. Tinnon at elizabeth.tinnon@usm.edu.

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

© 2017 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
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