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Effects of dietary and exercise intervention on weight loss and body composition in obese postmenopausal women

a systematic review and meta-analysis

Cheng, Chao-Chun MS; Hsu, Ching-Yun MD, PhD; Liu, Jen-Fang MD, PhD

doi: 10.1097/GME.0000000000001085
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Objective: This study examined the effects of dietary and exercise interventions on weight loss and body composition in overweight/obese peri- and postmenopausal women.

Methods: Medline, Central, Embase, and Google Scholar databases were searched for relevant trials conducted until December 31, 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and prospective studies of overweight/obese peri- or postmenopausal women that examined the effects of dietary or exercise interventions, alone or combined, on weight loss were included. The primary outcome was percentage reduction in body weight.

Results: From 292 studies initially identified, 11 studies with 12 sets of participants were included. Both dietary and exercise intervention groups had significantly greater weight loss than control groups (diet vs control: difference in means = −6.55, 95% CI, −9.51 to −3.59, P < 0.001; exercise vs control: difference in means = −3.49, 95% CI, −6.96 to −0.02, P = 0.049). Combined dietary and exercise interventions resulted in greater weight loss than dietary interventions alone (diet plus exercise vs diet: difference in means = −1.22, 95% CI, −2.14 to −0.29, P = 0.010). Diet plus exercise resulted in greater fat loss (difference in means = −0.44, 95% CI, −0.67 to −0.20, P < 0.001) and greater lean mass loss (difference in means = −0.84, 95% CI, −1.13 to −0.55, P < 0.001) than diet alone.

Conclusions: Dietary interventions reduced body weight and body composition profile parameters in peri- and postmenopausal women more than exercise alone. The addition of exercise reinforced the effect of dietary interventions on changing body weight and composition.

Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, Research Center for Industry of Human Ecology and Research Center for Chinese Herbal Medicine, College of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan; and Graduate Institute of Business and Management, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.

Address correspondence to: Chao-Chun Cheng, MS, Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, No. 261, Wenhua 1st Rd., Guishan Dist., Taoyuan City 33303, Taiwan (ROC). E-mail: michelle@mail.cgust.edu.tw

Received 28 August, 2017

Revised 29 January, 2018

Accepted 29 January, 2018

C-CC and C-YH equally contributed to this work.

Funding/support: None.

Financial disclosure/conflicts of interest: None reported.

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© 2018 by The North American Menopause Society.