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Periodontal assessment of postmenopausal women receiving risedronate

Palomo, Leena DDS, MSD1; Bissada, Nabil F DDS, MSD1; Liu, James MD2

doi: 10.1097/01.gme.0000184421.50696.34
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Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare periodontal status of postmenopausal women with mild to moderate osteoporosis who use risedronate therapy with those who do not.

Design: In this cross-sectional study, a total of 60 age-matched postmenopausal women with mild to moderate osteoporosis diagnosed by a bone density scan T score below −2.5 at either spine or hip were divided into two groups. Women in the experimental group had used systemic risedronate once weekly (35 mg) for at least 3 months. Women in the control group had never used bisphosphonate therapy. The periodontal status of each subject was evaluated through a clinical periodontal examination including evaluation of periodontal probing depth, gingival recession, gingival index, plaque score, attachment loss, and alveolar bone level. The significance in differences between the two groups was assessed using two-tailed paired t tests.

Results: Significant differences (P < 0.05) were found between risedronate and control groups for periodontal probing depth (2.6 vs 2.9 mm), gingival index (0.37 vs 0.71), plaque score (56.2 vs 77.0), attachment loss (2.8 vs 3.2 mm), and alveolar bone level (3.1 and 4.0), respectively. Gingival recession parameters did not differ significantly. Five of six periodontal parameters evaluated show that postmenopausal women with mild to moderate osteoporosis using risedronate therapy have healthier periodontal status than those who do not use bisphosphonates.

Conclusions: Women using risedronate therapy show significantly less plaque accumulation, less gingival inflammation, lower probing depths, less periodontal attachment loss, and greater alveolar bone levels. These observations suggest that risedronate therapy may play a beneficial role in periodontal status.

Women using risedronate therapy show statistically less plaque accumulation, less gingival inflammation, lower probing depths, less periodontal attachment loss, and greater alveolar bone levels. These observations suggest that risedronate therapy may play a beneficial role in periodontal status.

From the 1Department of Periodontology, Case Western Reserve University, Case School of Dental Medicine, Cleveland, OH; and 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospitals of Cleveland, and Department of Reproductive Biology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH.

Received September 1, 2004; revised and accepted February 24, 2005.

Address correspondence to: James Liu, MD, Chair, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Department of Reproductive Biology, Case Western Reserve University, 11100 Euclid Ave MAC 7105, Cleveland, OH 44106-5034. E-mail: james.liu@uhhs.com.

©2005The North American Menopause Society