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Association of estrogen and vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms with tooth loss and oral bone loss in Japanese postmenopausal women

Taguchi, Akira DDS, PhD1; Kobayashi, Junya PhD2; Suei, Yoshikazu DDS, PhD1; Ohtsuka, Masahiko BS2; Nakamoto, Takashi DDS2; Tanimoto, Keiji DDS, PhD2; Sanada, Mitsuhiro MD, PhD3; Tsuda, Mikio MD4; Ohama, Koso MD, PhD4

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Objective To investigate the relationship between estrogen receptor (ER) and vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms and tooth loss, oral bone loss, and postcranial bone mineral density (BMD) in Japanese postmenopausal women.

Design Polymorphisms at the ER Pvu II and Xba I and VDR Bsm I gene sites, number of teeth remaining, oral bone mass, and BMD of the lumbar spine and the hip were evaluated in 149 Japanese postmenopausal women.

Results The distribution of ER Pvu II and Xba I and VDR Bsm I restriction fragment length polymorphisms was as follows: pp, 30.2%; Pp, 49.7%; PP, 20.1%; xx, 71.8%; Xx, 22.5%; XX, 2.7%; bb, 76.5%; Bb, 22.2%; and BB, 1.3%. Analysis of covariance adjusted for confounding variables revealed that participants with pp allele had fewer teeth remaining than did those with P allele. There were no significant differences in oral bone mass and postcranial BMD among three alleles at the Pvu II site. Participants with X and bb allele had less oral bone mass and lower postcranial BMD than did those with xx and B allele, respectively. We could not clarify the positive associations between Xba I and Bsm I polymorphism and number of teeth.

Conclusions Pvu II polymorphism was associated with tooth loss, but not with oral bone mass and postcranial BMD. Xba I and Bsm I polymorphisms may be associated with bone mass or density; however, Pvu II polymorphism might contribute to another unknown pathway related to tooth loss.

From the 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Hiroshima University Dental Hospital; the 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Division of Medical Intelligence and Informatics, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University; the 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hiroshima University Medical Hospital; and the 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Clinical Medical Science, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan.

Received August 26, 2002; revised and accepted November 13, 2002.

This study was supported by a grant-in-aid for scientific research from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, no. 14571786.

Address reprint requests to Akira Taguchi, DDS, PhD, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Hiroshima University Dental Hospital, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553, Japan. E-mail: akiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp.

©2003The North American Menopause Society