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November-December 2008 - Volume 33 - Issue 6
pp: 335-396


Should Clinical Practice Be Required of Nurse Faculty?

Wall, Natalie

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 33(6):336, November-December 2008.

Cynics say “if you can't do, then teach.” We know that's not true in nursing, but there is an ongoing debate whether clinical faculty should be practicing clinically. You'll enjoy reading both sides of this interesting topic.


Marching Athletes: Injuries and Illnesses at Band Camp

Kilanowski, Jill F.

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 33(6):338-345, November-December 2008.

Large numbers of adolescents do it. Maybe you did as well. Marching band is extremely popular in some high schools. Are those children prepared for the athleticism required for participation? This nurse examined this topic.

EFFICACY OF THE MARQUETTE METHOD OF NATURAL FAMILY PLANNING

FEHRING, RICHARD J.; SCHNEIDER, MARY; BARRON, MARY LEE

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 33(6):348-354, November-December 2008.

There are women who would prefer not to use hormonal methods of contraception, and for these women, the options are limited. These nurses describe a natural method of contraception that you should know about.

Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) in Pregnancy: A Review

Fleschler, Robin; Peskin, Melissa F.

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 33(6):355-361, November-December 2008.

More and more, the women we care for are taking anti-anxiety medications. SSRIs are particularly prevalent. Do you know their side effects in pregnancy, or whether they are safe for breastfeeding mothers?

New Mothers' Views of Weight and Exercise

Groth, Susan W.; David, Tamala

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 33(6):364-370, November-December 2008.

Retention of “baby weight” after a pregnancy can become a lifelong issue for women. These nurses examined how to help new mothers shed those pounds.

Shaken Baby Syndrome Education Program: Nurses Making a Difference

Smith, Kim M.; deGuehery, Kathleen A.

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 33(6):371-375, November-December 2008.

The newspaper stories about shaken baby syndrome are always upsetting. What can nurses do to prevent this? Read this article to find out.

Understanding Child Feeding Practices of Vietnamese Mothers

Babington, Lynn; Patel, Bavika

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 33(6):376-381, November-December 2008.

In our global world, perinatal and pediatric nurses come into contact with new mothers of all ethnicities. Culture plays a large part in feeding practices, and these nurses studied the culture of feeding in an important minority population in the United States

The Hospital-Based Adoption Process: A Primer for Perinatal Nurses

Smith, Kerri J.; Brandon, Debbie

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 33(6):382-388, November-December 2008.

Adoption is a topic that most nurses know little about, yet they might be faced with practice situations that require them to interact with adoptive parents and birthparents. This article can bring you up to speed on this topic.




The Electronic Personal Health Record

McCartney, Patricia R.

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 33(6):390, November-December 2008.

Remember when our health records “belonged” to others, and we couldn't even read them? How things have changed! Read all about the personal health record available on the Internet.


Full of Good Works: The Tabitha Foundation

Callister, Lynn Clark

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 33(6):391, November-December 2008.

As we continually read and hear about all the bad news around the world, Dr. Callister brings us an uplifting story about a group dedicated to doing good works for those who need it the most.



Excessive Uterine Activity During Labor

Simpson, Kathleen Rice

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 33(6):396, November-December 2008.

Although L&D nurses are required to administer oxytocin routinely in their practice, the definition of and treatment for excessive uterine activity can be a source of clinical disagreements.

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