January/February 2020 - Volume 45 - Issue 1 - Contributor Index

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World Health Organization Alert on High Level of Sugar in Baby Food

Beal, Judy A.

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):60, January/February 2020.

The World Health Organization recently published guidelines about high levels of sugar in foods marketed to babies, children, and adolescents. High sugar foods can be detrimental to one's health in the short and long-term. Our pediatric nursing expert, Dr. Beal, explains the latest guidelines and suggests how nurses can help parents avoid foods with excessive sugar for their children.

Resilience: Inspiring Women Overcoming Daunting Obstacles

Callister, Lynn Clark

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):62, January/February 2020.

It is important for nurses to be aware of how many women are persevering around the world in sometimes very daunting circumstances, such as refugee camps and settlements, so nurses can be ready to help if encountering women with these experiences, especially immigrants to the United States, in nurses' scope of care. Our global health nursing expert, Dr. Callister, provides an update by sharing stories of women recently featured by United Nations Women.

Author:
Cho, Hyang

Korean Immigrant Women's Postpartum Experiences in the United States

Han, Meekyung; Goyal, Deepika; Lee, Jiyoung; More

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):42-48, January/February 2020.

Korean Americans are one of the six largest Asian American subgroups, representing 9% of the Asian American population in the United States, however they have not been well represented in studies of postpartum depression. In this study, Korean women who had immigrated to the United States were interviewed about their postpartum experience.

Perceptions of Birth Fathers about their Open Adoption

Clutter, Lynn B.

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):26-32, January/February 2020.

The open adoption triad refers to three parties, adoptee, birth family, adoptive family. Of the triad, little is known about birth fathers, who are rarely involved beyond relinquishment. In this study, birth fathers involved with open adoption share their experiences.

Pregnant African American Women's Perceptions of Neighborhood, Racial Discrimination, and Psychological Distress as Influences on Birth Outcomes

Dove-Medows, Emily; Deriemacker, Amanda; Dailey, Rhonda; More

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):49-56, January/February 2020.

African American women are more likely to experience preterm birth compared with White women. Social factors such as neighborhood disorder and experiences of racial discrimination, which disproportionately affect African American women, may partially explain these disparities. In this study pregnant African American women were interviewed to get their perceptions of neighborhood disorder, racial discrimination, and psychological distress and whether these concepts were viewed as influences on birth outcomes.

Pregnant African American Women's Perceptions of Neighborhood, Racial Discrimination, and Psychological Distress as Influences on Birth Outcomes

Dove-Medows, Emily; Deriemacker, Amanda; Dailey, Rhonda; More

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):49-56, January/February 2020.

African American women are more likely to experience preterm birth compared with White women. Social factors such as neighborhood disorder and experiences of racial discrimination, which disproportionately affect African American women, may partially explain these disparities. In this study pregnant African American women were interviewed to get their perceptions of neighborhood disorder, racial discrimination, and psychological distress and whether these concepts were viewed as influences on birth outcomes.

Pregnant African American Women's Perceptions of Neighborhood, Racial Discrimination, and Psychological Distress as Influences on Birth Outcomes

Dove-Medows, Emily; Deriemacker, Amanda; Dailey, Rhonda; More

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):49-56, January/February 2020.

African American women are more likely to experience preterm birth compared with White women. Social factors such as neighborhood disorder and experiences of racial discrimination, which disproportionately affect African American women, may partially explain these disparities. In this study pregnant African American women were interviewed to get their perceptions of neighborhood disorder, racial discrimination, and psychological distress and whether these concepts were viewed as influences on birth outcomes.

Emerging Views of Kinships Created Through Oocyte Donation

Hershberger, Patricia E.; Driessnack, Martha; Kavanaugh, Karen; More

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):18-24, January/February 2020.

The United States has the highest number of oocyte donation cycles, which account for an estimated one quarter of those worldwide. There is minimal evidence to support understanding of kinship views of those intimately involved. In this study, women who were donor oocyte recipients and their partners, as well as women who were oocyte donors, were interviewed 10 to 12 years after the procedure.

Parental Concerns about Newborn Feeding Post Hospital Discharge

Fuhrman, Lauren; Ross, Erin Sundseth

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):34-40, January/February 2020.

Many new parents have questions about infant feeding after discharge from the hospital. In this project, parents of preterm and term babies and those being breastfed, bottle-fed, or a combination of both attending a post discharge feeding clinic share their infant feeding concerns. Strategies to help parents with feeding challenges are included.

Pregnant African American Women's Perceptions of Neighborhood, Racial Discrimination, and Psychological Distress as Influences on Birth Outcomes

Dove-Medows, Emily; Deriemacker, Amanda; Dailey, Rhonda; More

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):49-56, January/February 2020.

African American women are more likely to experience preterm birth compared with White women. Social factors such as neighborhood disorder and experiences of racial discrimination, which disproportionately affect African American women, may partially explain these disparities. In this study pregnant African American women were interviewed to get their perceptions of neighborhood disorder, racial discrimination, and psychological distress and whether these concepts were viewed as influences on birth outcomes.

Korean Immigrant Women's Postpartum Experiences in the United States

Han, Meekyung; Goyal, Deepika; Lee, Jiyoung; More

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):42-48, January/February 2020.

Korean Americans are one of the six largest Asian American subgroups, representing 9% of the Asian American population in the United States, however they have not been well represented in studies of postpartum depression. In this study, Korean women who had immigrated to the United States were interviewed about their postpartum experience.

Korean Immigrant Women's Postpartum Experiences in the United States

Han, Meekyung; Goyal, Deepika; Lee, Jiyoung; More

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):42-48, January/February 2020.

Korean Americans are one of the six largest Asian American subgroups, representing 9% of the Asian American population in the United States, however they have not been well represented in studies of postpartum depression. In this study, Korean women who had immigrated to the United States were interviewed about their postpartum experience.

Emerging Views of Kinships Created Through Oocyte Donation

Hershberger, Patricia E.; Driessnack, Martha; Kavanaugh, Karen; More

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):18-24, January/February 2020.

The United States has the highest number of oocyte donation cycles, which account for an estimated one quarter of those worldwide. There is minimal evidence to support understanding of kinship views of those intimately involved. In this study, women who were donor oocyte recipients and their partners, as well as women who were oocyte donors, were interviewed 10 to 12 years after the procedure.

Emerging Views of Kinships Created Through Oocyte Donation

Hershberger, Patricia E.; Driessnack, Martha; Kavanaugh, Karen; More

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):18-24, January/February 2020.

The United States has the highest number of oocyte donation cycles, which account for an estimated one quarter of those worldwide. There is minimal evidence to support understanding of kinship views of those intimately involved. In this study, women who were donor oocyte recipients and their partners, as well as women who were oocyte donors, were interviewed 10 to 12 years after the procedure.

Pregnant African American Women's Perceptions of Neighborhood, Racial Discrimination, and Psychological Distress as Influences on Birth Outcomes

Dove-Medows, Emily; Deriemacker, Amanda; Dailey, Rhonda; More

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):49-56, January/February 2020.

African American women are more likely to experience preterm birth compared with White women. Social factors such as neighborhood disorder and experiences of racial discrimination, which disproportionately affect African American women, may partially explain these disparities. In this study pregnant African American women were interviewed to get their perceptions of neighborhood disorder, racial discrimination, and psychological distress and whether these concepts were viewed as influences on birth outcomes.

Author:
Kim, Amber

Korean Immigrant Women's Postpartum Experiences in the United States

Han, Meekyung; Goyal, Deepika; Lee, Jiyoung; More

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):42-48, January/February 2020.

Korean Americans are one of the six largest Asian American subgroups, representing 9% of the Asian American population in the United States, however they have not been well represented in studies of postpartum depression. In this study, Korean women who had immigrated to the United States were interviewed about their postpartum experience.

Emerging Views of Kinships Created Through Oocyte Donation

Hershberger, Patricia E.; Driessnack, Martha; Kavanaugh, Karen; More

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):18-24, January/February 2020.

The United States has the highest number of oocyte donation cycles, which account for an estimated one quarter of those worldwide. There is minimal evidence to support understanding of kinship views of those intimately involved. In this study, women who were donor oocyte recipients and their partners, as well as women who were oocyte donors, were interviewed 10 to 12 years after the procedure.

Immigrant Women's Experiences as Mothers in the United States: A Scoping Review

Oerther, Sarah; Lach, Helen W.; Oerther, Daniel

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):6-16, January/February 2020.

Since 1970, the increase in U.S. births has been driven in part by immigrant mothers. While mothering is a universal experience among women who have children, little is known about the broad experiences of immigrant women from different cultures who are mothering in the United States. In this scoping review, gaps in the literature are identified and recommendations for future research are offered.

Korean Immigrant Women's Postpartum Experiences in the United States

Han, Meekyung; Goyal, Deepika; Lee, Jiyoung; More

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):42-48, January/February 2020.

Korean Americans are one of the six largest Asian American subgroups, representing 9% of the Asian American population in the United States, however they have not been well represented in studies of postpartum depression. In this study, Korean women who had immigrated to the United States were interviewed about their postpartum experience.

Pregnant African American Women's Perceptions of Neighborhood, Racial Discrimination, and Psychological Distress as Influences on Birth Outcomes

Dove-Medows, Emily; Deriemacker, Amanda; Dailey, Rhonda; More

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):49-56, January/February 2020.

African American women are more likely to experience preterm birth compared with White women. Social factors such as neighborhood disorder and experiences of racial discrimination, which disproportionately affect African American women, may partially explain these disparities. In this study pregnant African American women were interviewed to get their perceptions of neighborhood disorder, racial discrimination, and psychological distress and whether these concepts were viewed as influences on birth outcomes.

Pregnant African American Women's Perceptions of Neighborhood, Racial Discrimination, and Psychological Distress as Influences on Birth Outcomes

Dove-Medows, Emily; Deriemacker, Amanda; Dailey, Rhonda; More

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):49-56, January/February 2020.

African American women are more likely to experience preterm birth compared with White women. Social factors such as neighborhood disorder and experiences of racial discrimination, which disproportionately affect African American women, may partially explain these disparities. In this study pregnant African American women were interviewed to get their perceptions of neighborhood disorder, racial discrimination, and psychological distress and whether these concepts were viewed as influences on birth outcomes.

Immigrant Women's Experiences as Mothers in the United States: A Scoping Review

Oerther, Sarah; Lach, Helen W.; Oerther, Daniel

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):6-16, January/February 2020.

Since 1970, the increase in U.S. births has been driven in part by immigrant mothers. While mothering is a universal experience among women who have children, little is known about the broad experiences of immigrant women from different cultures who are mothering in the United States. In this scoping review, gaps in the literature are identified and recommendations for future research are offered.

Immigrant Women's Experiences as Mothers in the United States: A Scoping Review

Oerther, Sarah; Lach, Helen W.; Oerther, Daniel

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):6-16, January/February 2020.

Since 1970, the increase in U.S. births has been driven in part by immigrant mothers. While mothering is a universal experience among women who have children, little is known about the broad experiences of immigrant women from different cultures who are mothering in the United States. In this scoping review, gaps in the literature are identified and recommendations for future research are offered.

Plan S[hock]

Rohan, Annie J.

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):5, January/February 2020.

Increasingly, funding agencies are requiring research publications to be open access (freely available; not behind a paywall). When authors submit an article to an open access journal or a hybrid journal (like MCN) that has both open access and subscription articles, an open access fee (article processing charge) is paid by the author or paid on their behalf by the author's institution or funding agency. Our associate editor, Dr. Rohan, explains Plan S, a strategy to move more scientific publications to open access and the future implications for scientists, research institutions, and publishers.

Parental Concerns about Newborn Feeding Post Hospital Discharge

Fuhrman, Lauren; Ross, Erin Sundseth

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):34-40, January/February 2020.

Many new parents have questions about infant feeding after discharge from the hospital. In this project, parents of preterm and term babies and those being breastfed, bottle-fed, or a combination of both attending a post discharge feeding clinic share their infant feeding concerns. Strategies to help parents with feeding challenges are included.

New Standards for Maternal Safety in Birthing Hospitals

Simpson, Kathleen Rice

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):68, January/February 2020.

The Joint Commission has published new standards for maternal safety that will be effective this year for all their accredited hospitals. They include details of care recommended for women with obstetric hemorrhage and severe hypertension or preeclampsia. A review of the new standards and implications for practice are presented.

Using Gender-Neutral Terms in Lactation

Spatz, Diane L.

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):61, January/February 2020.

Recently, the International Lactation Consultants Association released a statement about using inclusive language for lactation. Recommendations include using the term “human milk” rather than “breast milk” or “mother's own milk” and using the term “parent(s)” instead of gendered language. Our expert on breastfeeding, Dr. Spatz, explains how we can apply gender-neutral terminology to all aspects of lactation.

Pregnant African American Women's Perceptions of Neighborhood, Racial Discrimination, and Psychological Distress as Influences on Birth Outcomes

Dove-Medows, Emily; Deriemacker, Amanda; Dailey, Rhonda; More

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):49-56, January/February 2020.

African American women are more likely to experience preterm birth compared with White women. Social factors such as neighborhood disorder and experiences of racial discrimination, which disproportionately affect African American women, may partially explain these disparities. In this study pregnant African American women were interviewed to get their perceptions of neighborhood disorder, racial discrimination, and psychological distress and whether these concepts were viewed as influences on birth outcomes.

The Zika Virus and Childbearing Women

Wisner, Kirsten

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 45(1):59, January/February 2020.

Guidelines on the Zika virus from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists have been updated with recommendations for prevention, screening, and monitoring. Our maternity nursing expert Dr. Wisner presents an overview.

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