November/December 2019 - Volume 44 - Issue 6 - Contributor Index

Alphabetical Search
D
E
F
I
J
L
Q
U
V
X
Y
Z

Mothers' Reasons for Early Breastfeeding Cessation

Morrison, April H.; Gentry, Retha; Anderson, Joanna

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):325-330, November/December 2019.

Research on maternal reasons for early breastfeeding cessation is limited. In this review, maternal explanations for stopping breastfeeding were examined. Reasons for early breastfeeding cessation are varied; however, the most common themes noted in the studies identified were perceived inadequate milk supply and breast or nipple pain. Nurses can target breastfeeding interventions in light of these findings.

Reducing Discomfort After Cesarean Birth Using Abdominal Binders

Tussey, Christina; Kelly, Lesly A.; Oja, Kenneth J.; More

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):310-316, November/December 2019.

There is great interest in options for enhancing pain relief measures that do not involve opioids for women after cesarean birth. This randomized controlled trial evaluated use of an abdominal binder for women after cesarean birth. Findings suggest abdominal binders can decrease pain related to ambulation, potentially enhancing postoperative recovery. As a nursing intervention, abdominal binders may offer women a safe nonpharmacologic option to provide comfort.

Drowning Remains a Leading Cause of Injury-Related Deaths in Children

Beal, Judy A.

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):359, November/December 2019.

A major cause of death for children and adolescents in the United States is drowning. Our pediatric nursing expert, Dr. Beal, discusses the clinical implications of the updated policy statement on prevention of drowning from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and offers suggestions for nursing interventions and parental resources including the AAP drowning prevention toolkit.

Mothers' Experiences Interacting with Infants after Traumatic Childbirth

Beck, Cheryl Tatano; Watson, Sue

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):338-344, November/December 2019.

During postpartum, prevalence of posttraumatic stress related to traumatic childbirth ranges from 4% in community samples to 18.5% in high-risk groups. Dr. Cheryl Beck, well known expert on childbirth trauma, and her colleague Sue Watson, present their study on mothers interacting with their babies after experiencing a traumatic childbirth. They offer suggestions for identifying traumatized new mothers in the inpatient setting and making referrals to mental health professionals.

Substandard and Falsified Medical Products: A Global Issue Affecting the Health of Women and Children

Callister, Lynn Clark

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):361, November/December 2019.

Substandard and falsified medical products are a growing threat to health around the world, but especially in low- and middle-income countries where disease burden is high and health resources are limited. Our global health nursing expert, Dr. Callister, explains the scope of the problem and how nurses can help women and families identify these dangerous products before using them.

Improving Perinatal Care Through Theory Application

Côté-Arsenault, Denise; Hubbard, Lori Johnson

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):345-350, November/December 2019.

Theories can increase nurses' understanding of maternal behaviors during the developmental processes of pregnancy and postpartum. In this article, relevant theories that maternity nurses will likely find useful are presented in an unfolding exemplar case. Application of theories to clinical practice can promote holistic nursing care, increase critical thinking, and improve nursing responsiveness to unique family situations such as pregnancy after loss and premature birth.

Mothers' Reasons for Early Breastfeeding Cessation

Morrison, April H.; Gentry, Retha; Anderson, Joanna

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):325-330, November/December 2019.

Research on maternal reasons for early breastfeeding cessation is limited. In this review, maternal explanations for stopping breastfeeding were examined. Reasons for early breastfeeding cessation are varied; however, the most common themes noted in the studies identified were perceived inadequate milk supply and breast or nipple pain. Nurses can target breastfeeding interventions in light of these findings.

Improving Perinatal Care Through Theory Application

Côté-Arsenault, Denise; Hubbard, Lori Johnson

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):345-350, November/December 2019.

Theories can increase nurses' understanding of maternal behaviors during the developmental processes of pregnancy and postpartum. In this article, relevant theories that maternity nurses will likely find useful are presented in an unfolding exemplar case. Application of theories to clinical practice can promote holistic nursing care, increase critical thinking, and improve nursing responsiveness to unique family situations such as pregnancy after loss and premature birth.

Reducing Discomfort After Cesarean Birth Using Abdominal Binders

Tussey, Christina; Kelly, Lesly A.; Oja, Kenneth J.; More

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):310-316, November/December 2019.

There is great interest in options for enhancing pain relief measures that do not involve opioids for women after cesarean birth. This randomized controlled trial evaluated use of an abdominal binder for women after cesarean birth. Findings suggest abdominal binders can decrease pain related to ambulation, potentially enhancing postoperative recovery. As a nursing intervention, abdominal binders may offer women a safe nonpharmacologic option to provide comfort.

Enhanced Recovery After Cesarean Birth

Killion, Molly M.

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):358, November/December 2019.

Our maternity nursing expert, Molly Killion, explains the nurses' role in applying the new guidelines on Enhanced Recovery After Surgery to clinical practice in caring for women having cesarean birth.

Reducing Discomfort After Cesarean Birth Using Abdominal Binders

Tussey, Christina; Kelly, Lesly A.; Oja, Kenneth J.; More

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):310-316, November/December 2019.

There is great interest in options for enhancing pain relief measures that do not involve opioids for women after cesarean birth. This randomized controlled trial evaluated use of an abdominal binder for women after cesarean birth. Findings suggest abdominal binders can decrease pain related to ambulation, potentially enhancing postoperative recovery. As a nursing intervention, abdominal binders may offer women a safe nonpharmacologic option to provide comfort.

Breastfeeding Support Guided by Swanson's Theory of Caring

Miller, Carrie Westmoreland; Wojnar, Danuta

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):351-356, November/December 2019.

Swanson's Theory of Caring can be useful in developing caring methods of offering breastfeeding support to new mothers. In this study, discussions of new mothers about the breastfeeding support they received in the hospital are analyzed using the caring theory as a framework.

Mothers' Reasons for Early Breastfeeding Cessation

Morrison, April H.; Gentry, Retha; Anderson, Joanna

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):325-330, November/December 2019.

Research on maternal reasons for early breastfeeding cessation is limited. In this review, maternal explanations for stopping breastfeeding were examined. Reasons for early breastfeeding cessation are varied; however, the most common themes noted in the studies identified were perceived inadequate milk supply and breast or nipple pain. Nurses can target breastfeeding interventions in light of these findings.

Informing New Mothers about Newborn Screening Bloodspot Repositories during Postpartum Hospitalization

Newcomb, Patricia; True, Barbara; Wells, Jo Nell; More

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):332-337, November/December 2019.

In this study, new mothers were asked about their knowledge of newborn screening and the bloodspot repository program in Texas. Maternal knowledge about basic genetics and risks of genetic testing was poor, but mothers reported strong trust in the state to make good decisions about using genetic material for research. Postpartum nurses are the most common source of information about newborn screening. Most new mothers do not have enough knowledge to give true informed consent for bloodspot storage.

Reducing Discomfort After Cesarean Birth Using Abdominal Binders

Tussey, Christina; Kelly, Lesly A.; Oja, Kenneth J.; More

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):310-316, November/December 2019.

There is great interest in options for enhancing pain relief measures that do not involve opioids for women after cesarean birth. This randomized controlled trial evaluated use of an abdominal binder for women after cesarean birth. Findings suggest abdominal binders can decrease pain related to ambulation, potentially enhancing postoperative recovery. As a nursing intervention, abdominal binders may offer women a safe nonpharmacologic option to provide comfort.

Informing New Mothers about Newborn Screening Bloodspot Repositories during Postpartum Hospitalization

Newcomb, Patricia; True, Barbara; Wells, Jo Nell; More

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):332-337, November/December 2019.

In this study, new mothers were asked about their knowledge of newborn screening and the bloodspot repository program in Texas. Maternal knowledge about basic genetics and risks of genetic testing was poor, but mothers reported strong trust in the state to make good decisions about using genetic material for research. Postpartum nurses are the most common source of information about newborn screening. Most new mothers do not have enough knowledge to give true informed consent for bloodspot storage.

No Journals, No Evidence-Based Practice: Research Inaccessibility Affects Many Nurses

Rogers, Melanie

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):309, November/December 2019.

It is a significant challenge to maintain up-to-date knowledge for evidence-based practice when so many nurses have lost access to research publications via the health library after graduation from nursing school. Nurses may be practicing based on out-of-date information. There is risk of harm to patients when nurses are unable to access and evaluate evidence for recommendations for high-quality nursing care. In this guest editorial, Melanie Rogers explains the problem and offers several viable solutions. She has launched a campaign about this topic on Twitter: #NoJournalsNoEBP @MRogersRN.

Factors Affecting Uncertainty in Women with High-Risk Pregnancies

Schmuke, Ashley D.

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):317-324, November/December 2019.

In this integrative review, women's uncertainty in high risk pregnancy is explored. Uncertainty is influenced by various personal, pregnancy-related, demographic, and health care-related factors. Nurses who appreciate the significance of uncertainty during pregnancy have the opportunity to help women in their understanding of a high-risk diagnosis during pregnancy through anticipatory guidance.

Listening to Women, Treating Them with Respect, and Honoring their Wishes during Childbirth are Critical Aspects of Safe, High-Quality Maternity Care

Simpson, Kathleen Rice

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):368, November/December 2019.

Recent surveys of new mothers suggest that we can do better in treating women with respect, listening to their concerns, and honoring their wishes during the childbirth process. The findings apply to all care providers and all birth settings, thus opportunities for improvement exist widely. Nurses are in an ideal position to lead the types of changes that are needed in maternity care.

The Need to Improve Human Milk Rates for Vulnerable Infants

Spatz, Diane L.

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):360, November/December 2019.

Our breastfeeding expert, Dr. Spatz, discusses her 10-step model to improve use of human milk and breastfeeding for vulnerable infants in the neonatal intensive care unit. The most vulnerable infants should receive 100% human milk diet for the entire hospital stay and beyond. For preterm or other vulnerable infants, human milk is a life-saving medical intervention. Parental education and support, along with a focus on the critical window of opportunity for establishing milk supply can enhance the likelihood of the infant being fed breastmilk as recommended.

Informing New Mothers about Newborn Screening Bloodspot Repositories during Postpartum Hospitalization

Newcomb, Patricia; True, Barbara; Wells, Jo Nell; More

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):332-337, November/December 2019.

In this study, new mothers were asked about their knowledge of newborn screening and the bloodspot repository program in Texas. Maternal knowledge about basic genetics and risks of genetic testing was poor, but mothers reported strong trust in the state to make good decisions about using genetic material for research. Postpartum nurses are the most common source of information about newborn screening. Most new mothers do not have enough knowledge to give true informed consent for bloodspot storage.

Reducing Discomfort After Cesarean Birth Using Abdominal Binders

Tussey, Christina; Kelly, Lesly A.; Oja, Kenneth J.; More

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):310-316, November/December 2019.

There is great interest in options for enhancing pain relief measures that do not involve opioids for women after cesarean birth. This randomized controlled trial evaluated use of an abdominal binder for women after cesarean birth. Findings suggest abdominal binders can decrease pain related to ambulation, potentially enhancing postoperative recovery. As a nursing intervention, abdominal binders may offer women a safe nonpharmacologic option to provide comfort.

Informing New Mothers about Newborn Screening Bloodspot Repositories during Postpartum Hospitalization

Newcomb, Patricia; True, Barbara; Wells, Jo Nell; More

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):332-337, November/December 2019.

In this study, new mothers were asked about their knowledge of newborn screening and the bloodspot repository program in Texas. Maternal knowledge about basic genetics and risks of genetic testing was poor, but mothers reported strong trust in the state to make good decisions about using genetic material for research. Postpartum nurses are the most common source of information about newborn screening. Most new mothers do not have enough knowledge to give true informed consent for bloodspot storage.

Author:
Watson, Sue

Mothers' Experiences Interacting with Infants after Traumatic Childbirth

Beck, Cheryl Tatano; Watson, Sue

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):338-344, November/December 2019.

During postpartum, prevalence of posttraumatic stress related to traumatic childbirth ranges from 4% in community samples to 18.5% in high-risk groups. Dr. Cheryl Beck, well known expert on childbirth trauma, and her colleague Sue Watson, present their study on mothers interacting with their babies after experiencing a traumatic childbirth. They offer suggestions for identifying traumatized new mothers in the inpatient setting and making referrals to mental health professionals.

Informing New Mothers about Newborn Screening Bloodspot Repositories during Postpartum Hospitalization

Newcomb, Patricia; True, Barbara; Wells, Jo Nell; More

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):332-337, November/December 2019.

In this study, new mothers were asked about their knowledge of newborn screening and the bloodspot repository program in Texas. Maternal knowledge about basic genetics and risks of genetic testing was poor, but mothers reported strong trust in the state to make good decisions about using genetic material for research. Postpartum nurses are the most common source of information about newborn screening. Most new mothers do not have enough knowledge to give true informed consent for bloodspot storage.

Breastfeeding Support Guided by Swanson's Theory of Caring

Miller, Carrie Westmoreland; Wojnar, Danuta

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(6):351-356, November/December 2019.

Swanson's Theory of Caring can be useful in developing caring methods of offering breastfeeding support to new mothers. In this study, discussions of new mothers about the breastfeeding support they received in the hospital are analyzed using the caring theory as a framework.

Show: