September/October 2019 - Volume 44 - Issue 5 - Contributor Index

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An End to Sugary Drinks: The American Academy of Pediatrics and American Heart Association Speak Out

Beal, Judy A.

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):297, September/October 2019.

Sugary drinks are unhealthy and should not be marketed to children and adolescents. Our pediatric nursing expert, Dr. Beal, reviews the recent statement by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association on public policies to reduce sugary drink consumption in children and adolescents.

Bedside Music Therapy for Women during Antepartum and Postpartum Hospitalization

Corey, Kristen; Fallek, Ronit; Benattar, Maya

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):277-283, September/October 2019.

Music therapy can be beneficial for women during antepartum and postpartum hospitalization. In this project, music therapists offered various types of music to hospitalized childbearing women, including live performances at the bedside, as part of a project to create a healing environment and help pregnant women and new mothers with soothing, relaxing options for self-care and quiet time.

Clinicians' Perspectives on Admission of Pregnant Women: A Triad

Breman, Rachel Blankstein; Iobst, Stacey; Paul, Julie; More

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):260-268, September/October 2019.

The decision on whether to admit a low-risk woman in early labor to the hospital is complex and involves a thorough assessment and many interrelated factors. In this study, nurses, midwives, and physicians offer their thought processes and perceptions of low-risk women presenting in early labor that influence the decision for admission. As admission in latent labor has been associated with a high number of interventions and an increased risk of cesarean birth, this study has important clinical implications.

A Quality Improvement Initiative to Reduce Opioid Consumption after Cesarean Birth

Burgess, Adriane; Harris, Amy; Wheeling, Julia; More

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):250-259, September/October 2019.

Reevaluation of routine prescription of opioids for postoperative pain has been one of the many responses to the opioid crisis in the United States. In this quality improvement project, an interdisciplinary team developed a bundle of nurse-initiated comfort measures to offer additional options for pain relief for women after cesarean birth. Provider order sets and prescribing practices were changed. Data were collected over the first year of the project. Opioid use during hospitalization and the amount prescribed at discharge decreased while patient satisfaction improved. Pain relief options as adjuncts to medication can be successfully integrated into clinical practice.

The POWHER School: Transforming Care Provided by Guatemalan Traditional Birth Attendants

Callister, Lynn Clark

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):299, September/October 2019.

Our global health and nursing expert, Dr. Callister, discusses the School of POWHER (Providing Outreach in Women's Health and Educational Resources) that was founded in Sololá in the western highlands of Guatemala in 2011 to help train traditional birth attendants for safe maternity care. Respect for culture and local customs are important aspects of this successful program.

Perspectives on Barriers and Facilitators in Caring for Women with Gestational Diabetes in Rural Appalachia

Chertok, Ilana R. Azulay; Silk, Jennifer J.; Kulasa, Kathryn A.

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):289-295, September/October 2019.

In this study, nurses, midwives, and physicians caring for women with diabetes in rural Appalachia offered their thoughts on common challenges and factors that promoted best care. The main challenges included limited resources, lack of adherence to recommendations, cultural influences including normalization of diabetes, and food culture. Collaborative care including accessible resources and patient motivation were perceived as beneficial.

Bedside Music Therapy for Women during Antepartum and Postpartum Hospitalization

Corey, Kristen; Fallek, Ronit; Benattar, Maya

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):277-283, September/October 2019.

Music therapy can be beneficial for women during antepartum and postpartum hospitalization. In this project, music therapists offered various types of music to hospitalized childbearing women, including live performances at the bedside, as part of a project to create a healing environment and help pregnant women and new mothers with soothing, relaxing options for self-care and quiet time.

Author:
Dermo, Roni MD

A Quality Improvement Initiative to Reduce Opioid Consumption after Cesarean Birth

Burgess, Adriane; Harris, Amy; Wheeling, Julia; More

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):250-259, September/October 2019.

Reevaluation of routine prescription of opioids for postoperative pain has been one of the many responses to the opioid crisis in the United States. In this quality improvement project, an interdisciplinary team developed a bundle of nurse-initiated comfort measures to offer additional options for pain relief for women after cesarean birth. Provider order sets and prescribing practices were changed. Data were collected over the first year of the project. Opioid use during hospitalization and the amount prescribed at discharge decreased while patient satisfaction improved. Pain relief options as adjuncts to medication can be successfully integrated into clinical practice.

Bedside Music Therapy for Women during Antepartum and Postpartum Hospitalization

Corey, Kristen; Fallek, Ronit; Benattar, Maya

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):277-283, September/October 2019.

Music therapy can be beneficial for women during antepartum and postpartum hospitalization. In this project, music therapists offered various types of music to hospitalized childbearing women, including live performances at the bedside, as part of a project to create a healing environment and help pregnant women and new mothers with soothing, relaxing options for self-care and quiet time.

Implementation of the Fetal Monitor Safety Nurse Role: Lessons Learned

Griggs, Kellie M.; Woodard, Elizabeth K.

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):269-276, September/October 2019.

The fetal monitoring safety nurse role, an innovative strategy to promote safer care during labor and birth, is described and evaluated by nurses who served in the role. Full budgetary support for the position is necessary to realize the potential benefits. Nurses appreciated the additional assistance in fetal heart rate tracing assessment, however felt that modifications in nurse staffing were required to make the new role operationally feasibile and effective.

A Quality Improvement Initiative to Reduce Opioid Consumption after Cesarean Birth

Burgess, Adriane; Harris, Amy; Wheeling, Julia; More

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):250-259, September/October 2019.

Reevaluation of routine prescription of opioids for postoperative pain has been one of the many responses to the opioid crisis in the United States. In this quality improvement project, an interdisciplinary team developed a bundle of nurse-initiated comfort measures to offer additional options for pain relief for women after cesarean birth. Provider order sets and prescribing practices were changed. Data were collected over the first year of the project. Opioid use during hospitalization and the amount prescribed at discharge decreased while patient satisfaction improved. Pain relief options as adjuncts to medication can be successfully integrated into clinical practice.

Clinicians' Perspectives on Admission of Pregnant Women: A Triad

Breman, Rachel Blankstein; Iobst, Stacey; Paul, Julie; More

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):260-268, September/October 2019.

The decision on whether to admit a low-risk woman in early labor to the hospital is complex and involves a thorough assessment and many interrelated factors. In this study, nurses, midwives, and physicians offer their thought processes and perceptions of low-risk women presenting in early labor that influence the decision for admission. As admission in latent labor has been associated with a high number of interventions and an increased risk of cesarean birth, this study has important clinical implications.

Perspectives on Barriers and Facilitators in Caring for Women with Gestational Diabetes in Rural Appalachia

Chertok, Ilana R. Azulay; Silk, Jennifer J.; Kulasa, Kathryn A.

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):289-295, September/October 2019.

In this study, nurses, midwives, and physicians caring for women with diabetes in rural Appalachia offered their thoughts on common challenges and factors that promoted best care. The main challenges included limited resources, lack of adherence to recommendations, cultural influences including normalization of diabetes, and food culture. Collaborative care including accessible resources and patient motivation were perceived as beneficial.

Clinicians' Perspectives on Admission of Pregnant Women: A Triad

Breman, Rachel Blankstein; Iobst, Stacey; Paul, Julie; More

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):260-268, September/October 2019.

The decision on whether to admit a low-risk woman in early labor to the hospital is complex and involves a thorough assessment and many interrelated factors. In this study, nurses, midwives, and physicians offer their thought processes and perceptions of low-risk women presenting in early labor that influence the decision for admission. As admission in latent labor has been associated with a high number of interventions and an increased risk of cesarean birth, this study has important clinical implications.

Substance Use Disorder: Prenatal, Intrapartum and Postpartum Care

Mahoney, Kathleen; Reich, Wendy; Urbanek, Susan

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):284-288, September/October 2019.

There has been a dramatic increase in the United States in the number of women who present with substance use disorder during pregnancy. An overview of care for women with substance use disorder during the childbearing process continuum is provided.

Clinicians' Perspectives on Admission of Pregnant Women: A Triad

Breman, Rachel Blankstein; Iobst, Stacey; Paul, Julie; More

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):260-268, September/October 2019.

The decision on whether to admit a low-risk woman in early labor to the hospital is complex and involves a thorough assessment and many interrelated factors. In this study, nurses, midwives, and physicians offer their thought processes and perceptions of low-risk women presenting in early labor that influence the decision for admission. As admission in latent labor has been associated with a high number of interventions and an increased risk of cesarean birth, this study has important clinical implications.

Substance Use Disorder: Prenatal, Intrapartum and Postpartum Care

Mahoney, Kathleen; Reich, Wendy; Urbanek, Susan

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):284-288, September/October 2019.

There has been a dramatic increase in the United States in the number of women who present with substance use disorder during pregnancy. An overview of care for women with substance use disorder during the childbearing process continuum is provided.

Perspectives on Barriers and Facilitators in Caring for Women with Gestational Diabetes in Rural Appalachia

Chertok, Ilana R. Azulay; Silk, Jennifer J.; Kulasa, Kathryn A.

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):289-295, September/October 2019.

In this study, nurses, midwives, and physicians caring for women with diabetes in rural Appalachia offered their thoughts on common challenges and factors that promoted best care. The main challenges included limited resources, lack of adherence to recommendations, cultural influences including normalization of diabetes, and food culture. Collaborative care including accessible resources and patient motivation were perceived as beneficial.

Maternal Mortality in the United States

Simpson, Kathleen Rice

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):249, September/October 2019.

Maternal mortality rates in the United States compare very unfavorably with other high-income countries. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that about 700 women die of pregnancy-related causes in the United States each year. A summary of their May 2019 report is presented. Nurses must continue to take a leadership role in efforts to reduce the unacceptably high maternal mortality in the United States.

Sepsis in Pregnancy and Postpartum

Simpson, Kathleen Rice

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):304, September/October 2019.

Sepsis in pregnancy and postpartum is a major cause of maternal death in the United States. As part of the continuing focus on preventing maternal mortality, new resources are reviewed, including the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine Consult Series on sepsis during pregnancy and the puerperium. Working together as part of an interdisciplinary team requires that all members of the team have knowledge of the most recent clinical guidelines and the ability to apply them to clinical practice.

Assessing Corporate Influence on Dietary Advice

Snow, Denise

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):298, September/October 2019.

It is important to have healthy skepticism when reading dietary advice because sometimes the sponsors or supporters of the source of this dietary advice have close relationships with the food industry. Funding from sources related to the topic of research can be acceptable as long as the relationships, sources, amounts, and potential conflicts of interest are fully disclosed in a transparent and detailed manner prominently within the document offering the advice or reporting the research results. Our nutrition expert, Denise Snow, explains the controversy.

Substance Use Disorder: Prenatal, Intrapartum and Postpartum Care

Mahoney, Kathleen; Reich, Wendy; Urbanek, Susan

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):284-288, September/October 2019.

There has been a dramatic increase in the United States in the number of women who present with substance use disorder during pregnancy. An overview of care for women with substance use disorder during the childbearing process continuum is provided.

A Quality Improvement Initiative to Reduce Opioid Consumption after Cesarean Birth

Burgess, Adriane; Harris, Amy; Wheeling, Julia; More

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):250-259, September/October 2019.

Reevaluation of routine prescription of opioids for postoperative pain has been one of the many responses to the opioid crisis in the United States. In this quality improvement project, an interdisciplinary team developed a bundle of nurse-initiated comfort measures to offer additional options for pain relief for women after cesarean birth. Provider order sets and prescribing practices were changed. Data were collected over the first year of the project. Opioid use during hospitalization and the amount prescribed at discharge decreased while patient satisfaction improved. Pain relief options as adjuncts to medication can be successfully integrated into clinical practice.

Sexual Assault: What do Perinatal Nurses Need to Know?

Wisner, Kirsten

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):296, September/October 2019.

Many women in the United States have experienced sexual violence. In a recent survey, nearly half of women have reported some type of contact sexual violence in their lifetime, and approximately one in five women reported an attempted or completed rape. Our maternity nursing expert, Dr. Wisner, offers advice on how to support women who have experienced sexual assault using trauma-informed care.

Implementation of the Fetal Monitor Safety Nurse Role: Lessons Learned

Griggs, Kellie M.; Woodard, Elizabeth K.

MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 44(5):269-276, September/October 2019.

The fetal monitoring safety nurse role, an innovative strategy to promote safer care during labor and birth, is described and evaluated by nurses who served in the role. Full budgetary support for the position is necessary to realize the potential benefits. Nurses appreciated the additional assistance in fetal heart rate tracing assessment, however felt that modifications in nurse staffing were required to make the new role operationally feasibile and effective.

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