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Articles by M. CYNTHIA LOGSDON, DNS, RN

Acceptability and Initial Efficacy of Education for Teen Mothers

Logsdon, M. Cynthia; Davis, Deborah Winders; Stikes, Reetta; More

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 40(3):186-192, May/June 2015.

Pregnant teens are in need of education about many aspects of prenatal health, labor, birth and postpartum, and infant care. The process of learning important information about maternal-newborn care and the challenges of retaining the information over time are explored in this study. Health literacy is essential to promoting quality outcomes for mothers and babies.

Identification of Mothers at Risk for Postpartum Depression by Hospital-Based Perinatal Nurses

Logsdon, M. Cynthia; Tomasulo, Roselyn; Eckert, Diane; More

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 37(4):218-225, July/August 2012.

This paper provides guidelines and suggests best practices for hospital-based perinatal nurses related to identifying postpartum depression.

Readability: An Important Issue Impacting Healthcare for Women with Postpartum Depression

Logsdon, M. Cynthia; Hutti, Marianne H.

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 31(6):350-355, November-December 2006.

We are all encouraged to assess women for postpartum depression and help women become more informed about this devastating problem. Are the materials we choose readable by the average woman?

WEB SITES FOR Postpartum Depression: Convenient, Frustrating, Incomplete, and Misleading

Summers, Audra L.; Logsdon, M. Cynthia

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 30(2):88-94, March-April 2005.

These nurses studied the Web sites for postpartum depression so you would have a better understanding of where to send your patients for quality information on this important topic.

Paraprofessional Support for Pregnant & Parenting Women

Logsdon, M. Cynthia; Davis, Deborah Winders

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 29(2):92-97, March-April 2004.

Many have suggested that pregnant women could have better outcomes if they were given support and teaching, not necessarily by a professional, but by a lay person trained to do so. What do you think? These authors reviewed that literature for the answer.