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Hyperlipidemia and Medical Expenditures by Cardiovascular Disease Status in US Adults

Zhang, Donglan PhD; Wang, Guijing PhD; Fang, Jing MD; Mercado, Carla PhD

doi: 10.1097/MLR.0000000000000663
Original Articles
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Background: Hyperlipidemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), affecting 73.5 million American adults. Information about health care expenditures associated with hyperlipidemia by CVD status is needed to evaluate the economic benefit of primary and secondary prevention programs for CVD.

Methods: The study sample includes 48,050 men and nonpregnant women ≥18 from 2010 to 2012 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. A 2-part econometric model was used to estimate annual hyperlipidemia-associated medical expenditures by CVD status. The estimation results from the 2-part model were used to calculate per-capita and national medical expenditures associated with hyperlipidemia. We adjusted the medical expenditures into 2012 dollars.

Results: Among those with CVD, per person hyperlipidemia-associated expenditures were $1105 [95% confidence interval (CI), $877–$1661] per year, leading to an annual national expenditure of $15.47 billion (95% CI, $5.23–$27.75 billion). Among people without CVD, per person hyperlipidemia-associated expenditures were $856 (95% CI, $596–$1211) per year, resulting in an annual national expenditure of $23.11 billion (95% CI, $16.09–$32.71 billion). Hyperlipidemia-associated expenditures were attributable mostly to the costs of prescription medication (59%–90%). Among people without CVD, medication expenditures associated with hyperlipidemia were $13.72 billion (95% CI, $10.55–$15.74 billion), higher in men than in women.

Conclusions: Hyperlipidemia significantly increased medical expenditures and the increase was higher in people with CVD than without. The information on estimated expenditures could be used to evaluate and develop effective programs for CVD prevention.

Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, GA

The findings and conclusions of this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Reprints: Guijing Wang, PhD, Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 4770 Buford Hwy NE, Mailstop F-75, Atlanta, GA 30341. E-mail: gbw9@cdc.gov.

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