Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Impact of Pressure Injuries on Patient Outcomes in a Korean Hospital

A Case-Control Study

Han, Yina; Jin, Yinji; Jin, Taixian; Lee, Sun-Mi; Lee, Ju-Young

Journal of Wound Ostomy & Continence Nursing: May/June 2019 - Volume 46 - Issue 3 - p 194–200
doi: 10.1097/WON.0000000000000528
Wound Care
Buy
SDC

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of pressure injuries on mortality, hospital length of stay, healthcare costs, and readmission rates in hospitalized patients.

DESIGN: A case-control study.

SUBJECTS AND SETTING: The sample comprised 5000 patients admitted to a tertiary hospital located in Seoul Korea; 1000 patients with pressure injuries (cases) were compared to 4000 patients who acted as controls.

METHODS: We retrospectively extracted clinical data from electronic health records. Study outcomes were mortality, hospital length of stay, healthcare costs, and readmission rates. The impact of pressure injuries on death and readmission was analyzed via multiple logistic regression, hospital deaths within 30 days were analyzed using the survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression, and impact on the length of hospitalization and medical costs were analyzed through a multiple linear regression.

RESULTS: Developing a pressure injury was significantly associated with an increased risk of in-hospital mortality (odds ratio [OR], 3.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.91-5.33), 30-days in-hospital mortality (OR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.59-3.00), and healthcare cost (β = 11,937,333; P < .001). Pressure injuries were significantly associated with an extended length of hospitalization (β = 20.84; P < .001) and length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay (β = 8.16; P < .001). Having a pressure injury was significantly associated with an increased risk of not being discharged home (OR, 5.55; 95% CI, 4.35-7.08), along with increased risks of readmission (OR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.05-1.62) and emergency department visits after discharge (OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.29-2.23).

CONCLUSIONS: Development of pressure injuries influenced mortality, healthcare costs, ICU and hospital length of stay, and healthcare utilization following discharge (ie, readmission or emergency department visits). Hospital-level efforts and interdisciplinary approaches should be prioritized to develop interventions and protocols for pressure injury prevention.

Yina Han, MSN, RN, Seoul St Mary's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea.

Yinji Jin, PhD, RN, College of Nursing, Yanbian University, Yanji, China.

Taixian Jin, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea.

Sun-Mi Lee, PhD, RN, College of Nursing, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea.

Ju-Young Lee, PhD, RN, College of Nursing, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea.

Correspondence: Ju-Young Lee, PhD, RN, College of Nursing, The Catholic University of Korea, 222 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul 06591, South Korea (jylee83@catholic.ac.kr).

This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (NRF-2010-0027077; NRF-2014R1A2A2A01003313).

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

© 2019 by the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society.