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OCHSNER M. GAGE M.D. F.A.C.S.; MANISCALCO-THEBERGE, MARY E. M.D., F.A.C.S.; CHAMPION, HOWARD R. F.R.C.S., F.A.C.S.
The Journal of Trauma: Injury, Infection, and Critical Care: July 1990
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Fibrin glue is a biologic hemostatic agent that coagulates and seals upon application. It is made by combining human fibrinogen concentrate with standard thrombin solutions containing calcium. Similar to epoxy glue, the two components are applied simultaneously in equal volumes resulting in an almost instantaneous formation of a coagulum. Fibrinogen concentrate is prepared in the blood bank from single donor plasma. Fibrin glue can be applied topically or injected into the parenchyma of solid organs.

Twenty-six patients sustained hepatic or splenic trauma from May through August 1989–17 liver and nine splenic injuries. The glue was effective after one application in 21 patients and after a second in five. Hemostasis was achieved despite coagulopathy and thrombocytopenia in eight patients. There were no re-explorations for bleeding, and nine complications occurred in six patients.

Our experience suggests fibrin glue is an effective, underutilized adjunctive hemostatic agent in trauma.

© Williams & Wilkins 1990. All Rights Reserved.