Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Correlation of Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis With Disk Degeneration

Toy, Jason O. BA*; Gordon, Zachary L. MD*; Eubanks, Jason D. MD; Cooperman, Daniel R. MD*; Ahn, Nicholas U. MD*

Journal of Spinal Disorders and Techniques: October 2013 - Volume 26 - Issue 7 - p 375–378
doi: 10.1097/BSD.0b013e31824ac8d4
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Buy

Summary of Background Data: Spinal osteoarthritis is greater in patients with known hip pathology secondary to alterations in spinopelvic geometry. To our knowledge, no study has investigated the long-term impact of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) on the spine.

Objective: To evaluate the relationship between SCFE and the presence of degenerative disk disease and facet arthrosis.

Study Design: An anatomic study of disk degeneration in cadaveric lumbar spines with SCFE.

Methods: An observational study was performed on 25 cadaveric specimens with SCFE and 647 controls that were identified out of 3100 total cadaveric specimens in an osteological collection. The specimens were evaluated for disk degeneration and facet arthrosis at L1/2 to L5/S1 using the classification of Eubanks and colleagues. Linear regression analyses were then used to determine the relationship between SCFE and lumbar disk and facet degeneration at each level, correcting for confounding factors such as age, sex, and race.

Results: Linear regression demonstrated a significant association (P<0.01) that was found between SCFE and degenerative disk disease at all levels from L1/2 to L5/S1. In addition, a significant association (P<0.01) was found between SCFE and facet arthrosis at all levels from L1/2 to L5/S1.

Conclusions: The findings of this study show a relationship between SCFE and lumbar disk degeneration and facet arthrosis. This relationship may prove useful in predicting the course of spinal osteoarthritis in patients with SCFE.

*Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals, Cleveland, OH

The Hamann-Todd osteological collection at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History provided all samples for this study. None of the authors received any financial support or materials from private or commercial entities for this research. This study did not require Institutional Review Board approval due to the exclusive use of deidentified cadaveric specimens.

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Reprints: Jason O. Toy, BA, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, 11100 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH 44106 (e-mails: Jot@Case.edu; Nicholas.ahn@uhhospitals.org).

Received March 21, 2011

Accepted January 6, 2012

© 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.