Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Most Popular Videos

Creator: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Duration: 5:51
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Clinical guidelines provide recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), with specific guidance on caring for children younger than 6 years. This exploratory study describes ADHD diagnosis and treatment patterns among young children in the U.S. using two nationally representative parent surveys. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Michelle Greene
Duration: 4:25
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
Mothers of very low birth weight infants (VLBW, birth weight less than 3 pounds, 5 ounces) experience maternal psychological distress, defined as depression, anxiety and perinatal post-traumatic stress (PPTS).This study estimated maternal distress at time of VLBW infants' birth, modeled change in distress over VLBW infants' first year of life, and examined predictors of distress. Distress declined over VLBW infants' first year of life. Mothers residing in lower income environments had lower PPTS and anxiety at VLBW infant birth. VLBW birth weight and maternal age, respectively, predicted change in anxiety over time, and change in depression over time. Read the article.
Creator: Rachel Morgan and Linda Prudente
Duration: 4:30
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
School-age children with ADHD participated in an 8-week after-school Tai-Chi that showed robust reductions in core ADHD symptoms of hyperactivity, impulsivity, and inattention after the mindful movement training. Reductions were also seen in associated features including emotion dysregulation and symptoms of ODD. These children also showed robust improvements on an objective assessment of developmental motor control, and these objective improvements in motor control were significantly associated with improvements in subjective parent ratings of ADHD behavior. This suggests that motor control may be a biomarker that could be targeted by the mindful movement intervention to improve behavior in children with ADHD.
Creator: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Duration: 5:28
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
Researchers conducted a multi-site, randomized controlled trial to examine the impact of the Legacy for Children program on child health and development. Results revealed Legacy has a positive impact on child emotional and behavioral outcomes, child IQ, and mother-child interactions. Read the article.
Creator: Nanette Gartrell, MD and Dee Mosbacher MD PhD
Duration: 4:01
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
Using the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children’s Health dataset, we compared spouse/partner relationships and parent-child relationships (family relationships), parenting stress, and children’s general health, emotional difficulties, coping behavior, and learning behavior (child outcomes) in households of same-sex (female) versus different-sex continuously coupled parents with biological offspring. We assessed whether associations among family relationships, parenting stress, and child outcomes were different in the two household types. We found that children with female same-sex parents and different-sex parents demonstrated no differences in outcomes, despite female same-sex parents reporting more parenting stress. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Rachael Coakley, PhD, Carolina Donado, PhD
Duration: 7:18
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics December 2019, Volume 40, Issue 9;
This study evaluates differences in how mothers and fathers perceive and respond to their adolescents’ chronic pain before and after The Comfort Ability Program (CAP), a one-day cognitive-behavioral intervention. Our research findings suggest that mothers and fathers have different thoughts and responses to their adolescents’ pain at baseline. Participating in CAP may help to align their thinking and promote more adaptive parent responses, reinforcing the value of including both parents in pediatric treatment for chronic pain. For more information about the program, please visit: thecomfortability.com
Creator: Jesse L. Coe
Duration: 4:27
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
This study evaluated the intergenerational indirect effects of maternal childhood experiences on infant development through maternal scaffolding behaviors. Participants included 295 low-income mothers and their infants who were assessed prenatally and at 6 and 12 months postpartum. Results indicated that mothers who perceived their own mothers as highly supportive in childhood were more likely to engage in scaffolding behaviors with their infants, who in turn made greater developmental progress (e.g., showed less risk for developmental delay) at 12 months postpartum. Maternal adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) were not associated with parenting or infant developmental progress.
Creator: Pinar Zengin Akkus
Duration: 4:06
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
Management of phenylketonuria (PKU) was reported to be time consuming and burdensome for caregivers. This study explored the experiences of families caring for a child with phenylketonuria/mild hyperphenylalaninemia in a country with a high PKU rate. Moreover, the factors associated with parental psychological well-being were highlighted. Read the article.
Creator: Megan Narad, Jessica King
Duration:
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
We report on the rate need for academic services and academic service utilization among a cohort of children who sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI) between the ages of 3 and 7 years old, as they transitioned to middle school, approximately 6.8 years after injury. Findings show the need for services among students with a history TBI remains high even years after injury. Rates of unmet need were high across all injury groups (46.2%-63.6%), underscoring the importance of continued monitoring of students with a history of TBI, especially children with less severe injuries who are at risk for being underserved. Read the article
Creator: Carol Strong & Meng-Che Tsai
Duration: 5:25
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
This video is a quick summary of the paper, “Adolescent Internet Use, Social Integration, and Depressive Symptoms: Analysis from a Longitudinal Cohort Survey.” It examined the association between adolescent leisure-time internet use and social connection in the school context, and how this association affects later depressive symptoms among adolescents in Taiwan. The results highlighted the needs for stakeholders of adolescent health to carefully assess adolescents’ social networking and mental well-being. Read the article.
Creator: Seattle Children’s Research Institute
Duration: 6:36
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
Lead author, Jennifer Gerdts, PhD, discusses the rationale for developing a streamlined and efficient interdisciplinary diagnostic evaluation for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at Seattle Children’s Autism Center (SCAC). Dr. Gerdts compares diagnostic outcomes, follow-up care rates, provider satisfaction, billed time, and reimbursement amounts in interdisciplinary teams to those of more traditional psychology-led and physician-led models. She also suggests benefits of this diagnostic approach for families of children with ASD. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Libby Matile Milkovich
Duration: 3:08
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
Phones interrupt in-person interactions. Problematic phone users likely have increased interruptions due to their addiction-like behaviors towards their phones. Child behavior can reflect the quality of in-person, caregiver-child interactions. To explore child behavior and caregiver problematic phone use, we surveyed caregivers of children about their problematic phone use and their perception of their child’s mealtime behavior. Higher ratings of child problematic mealtime behavior were associated with higher symptoms of caregiver problematic phone use. Although the study does not show causality, caregiver-child interactions are bidirectional thus possibly allowing for future child problematic behavioral interventions to address caregiver problematic phone use.
Creator: Dr. Elizabeth Berry-Kravis
Duration: 6:23
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
In this study we characterized toileting milestones and factors related to delayed toilet training in children with Fragile X Syndrome (FXS). For FXS participants in the FORWARD Registry and Database, a multi-variate analysis showed low language ability, behavioral irritability, and autism spectrum disorder diagnosis were strongly associated with late toilet training (>age 10). A Cox proportional-hazards model showed language level and ASD diagnosis predicted chances of toilet training at all ages. Survival curves allow estimation of likelihood of toilet training at any age. These findings will help with setting toileting expectations and creating management plans for toilet training in FXS. Read the article.
Creator: M. Jackson Wilkinson and Carol L. Wilkinson
Duration: 3:45
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
Primary care providers and parents rely on developmental milestone checklists as tools for tracking a child’s development. However, there are multiple published milestone checklists that vary in their structure and content. Our team systematically evaluated the consistency and variability between four commonly used milestone checklists. We found that there was limited overlap in the content across these four checklists. In addition, the milestones shared across checklists were inconsistent in their estimated ages of when milestones should occur. Our findings highlight the need for objectively defined and accurately normed developmental milestones. Read the article.
Creator: Karli V. Treyvaud et al & NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Newborn Medicine
Duration: 4:50
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
Discussion of a research study examining post-traumatic stress symptoms of mothers and fathers across the first two years after the very preterm birth of their child. Mothers and fathers completed questionnaires at three time points, and we assessed change in post-traumatic stress symptoms over time as well as whether medical or social risk factors were associated with symptoms. Implications for future predictive research and clinical support are discussed.
Creator: Gerald Giesbrecht and Lianne Tomfohr-Madsen
Duration: 3:29
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
Video abstract for Parental use of “cry out” in a community sample during the first year of infant life, where we discuss associations between using delayed response to crying and associations with infant-maternal attachment and maternal sensitivity.
Creator: Walter Zahorodny and Justin Smith
Duration: 8:21
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
This video is a brief summary of the article, "Preliminary Evaluation of a Brief Autism Screener for Young Children." It provides the reasons for undertaking development of a new parent report tool and describes the methodology and initial data assessing the usefulness of the PDQ-1, a brief Autism screener for toddler-age children. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Philip Bertulfo
Duration: 4:25
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
We sought to develop an improved understanding of attitudes and beliefs surrounding play among families who live in predominantly low-income urban communities. Utilizing qualitative methods, our results demonstrated caregivers of young children describe many important benefits of play. Yet they have misconceptions regarding use of toys and media in promoting development as well as notable barriers to participating in play, which may be opportunities for intervention. Public health programs may be more effectively implemented if they consider these attitudes to develop new or refine existing strategies for promoting parent-child learning activities. Read the article.
Creator: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Duration: 4:18
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) used parent-reported data from national studies in 2007 and 2011 to understand how having Tourette syndrome and other conditions affect how children do in school, like repeating a grade, school problems, or needing special services. Having other conditions along with Tourette Syndrome was related to having difficulty in school and needing educational services. This is important information for healthcare providers, teachers and parents. Being aware of the potential challenges related to both Tourette syndrome and other conditions can help them to best support the child’s education. For further information on CDC’s research in this area, visit: www.cdc.gov/tourette.Read the article.
Creator: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
Duration: 4:12
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
Lead author, Julia Anixt, MD presents findings from a research study evaluating the types of challenging behaviors parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) prioritize for treatment during Developmental Behavioral Pediatric (DBP) clinic visits. This study explores how much shared decision making (SDM) occurs during “usual care” DBP clinic visits, how often parent priorities are addressed in the treatment plan, and how often parents feel uncertain about the decision of whether to use medication to treat their children’s challenging behaviors. Read the article.
Creator: Andrew R. Riley
Duration: 3:24
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
Pediatric primary care is an important setting for promoting safe and effective parenting practices, especially with regards to child discipline, but many parents report they receive inadequate behavioral guidance. We conducted a survey to identify which behavioral topics are most important to parents and what delivery method (e.g., faceto- face, books, mobile apps) are most appealing. Participants were 396 parents of young children recruited from primary care offices. Nearly all parents (96%) endorsed a behavioral topic (e.g., aggression) as important, and most preferred to receive intervention during routine medical appointments, but preferences varied by known socioeconomic, child, and parenting risk factors. Tailoring intervention to parents’ preferences may increase engagement with available interventions. Read the article.
Creator: Veni Kandasamy; Krysten Carrera (HRSA's Maternal and Child Health Bureau); Milton Thomas (HRSA's Office of the Administrator)
Duration: 2:34
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
This is a video abstract for the Parental Perception of Flourishing in School-Aged Children: 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health manuscript. We discuss what flourishing in children is and its importance. We also discuss our data source, HRSA's National Survey of Children's Health. Our study findings that approximately half of school-aged children were found to be flourishing and that differences by sociodemographic factors in the likelihood of flourishing were reduced with the inclusion of environmental factors are also described. We close with next steps and areas for further study in flourishing. Read the article.
Creator: Suzanne Tough
Duration: 3:00
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
This study examines risk and protective factors associated with externalizing behavior among 1300 children. We found that moms who faced more mental health challenges when their children were two were more likely to report that their children had externalizing behaviors at age three. Children in daycare, or whose moms participated in community activities, such as story time at the library, were less likely to report externalizing behavior in their children. Opportunities for children to practice their self-regulation skills through structured interactions with same age peers can enhance school readiness and should be made accessible to all families. Read the article.
Creator: Jessica VanOrmer, M.A.
Duration: 2:30
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
This study included 2,083 parents of children from the 2016 National Survey of Children’s health database. We examined the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and family resilience, including how these differed by diagnostic category (autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), comorbid ASD and ADHD, and neurotypically developing children). We found that ADHD children experienced significantly more ACEs and children with comorbid ASD and ADHD had the lowest levels of family resilience when controlling for demographic variables and ACEs. Further, as the number of ACEs increased, family resilience decreased. Results have implications for early intervention services. Read the article.
Creator: Thi-Nhu-Ngoc Nguyen
Duration: 4:12
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
Children born preterm are at high risk of multiple developmental impairments, including language difficulties across childhood. However, it is unclear as to which biological and socio-environmental factors are reliable predictors of poorer language development, and how the influence of these factors change across childhood in preterm children. This study examined the individual and collective contribution of biological and socioenvironmental factors on language development in a prospective, longitudinal cohort of preterm children (born< 30 weeks' gestation). Results highlight the important and increasing influence of socio-environmental factors on language functioning in preterm children from 2 to 13 years, and points to an important focus on targeting more malleable factors such as parenting behavior and parent education to boost and support preterm children's development. Read the article.
Creator: Mater Research
Duration: 4:47
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
The Queensland Flood Study (QF2011) took advantage of a severe flood in Queensland, Australia to investigate the effects of disaster-related prenatal maternal stress on temperament characteristics at 6-months-old. Results showed that mothers’ subjective stress reactions and cognitive appraisal of the disaster while pregnant were associated with easier aspects of temperament in their infants. However, with higher levels of hardship in pregnancy, boys (but not girls) were rated as more irritable. Higher levels of hardship in early pregnancy also predicted more arrhythmic behavior. Finally, mothers whose emotional response to the flood exceeded the hardship they endured reported more active-reactive infants. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Jon Izaguirre, Xavier Vall, Dolores Miguel-Ruiz, Jose A. Alda, and Anna Huguet
Duration: 2:37
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
72 children aged 7-12 years with ADHD were randomized in two groups (mindfulness and control) with the aim to investigate efficacy of a structured mindfulness group intervention program targeting ADHD core symptoms and difficulties in emotion regulation. This study provides evidence supporting mindfulness as a useful intervention modality for the treatment of ADHD. Read the article.
Creator: Wilko Duprez
Duration: 4:51
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
This longitudinal study assessed the intellectual, academic and executive functioning skills of children diagnosed with ADHD at diagnosis and four years later. Intellectual function was stable over the four-year interval. Reliable change analyses highlighted variability in academic performance, with half the children showing performance declines in at least one academic subject. Executive functions followed a generally stable or improving course. There was some evidence of better neurocognitive performance in those with partial symptom remission at follow up, however early cognitive functioning did not predict symptom outcome over time. Findings emphasize the importance of monitoring academic performance in children with ADHD. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Aleix Cabrera, Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) Video
Duration: 02:43
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
This study is the first to demonstrate associations between a longer time spent engaging in cognitively stimulating activities and lower scores of both ADHD symptoms and behavior problems, in ADHD-free children at baseline. We also found that sleeping longer was associated with a lower ADHD symptom score. In contrast, time spent watching TV and time spent engaging in physical activity at age 4 years were not associated with ADHD symptoms or behavior problems at age 7 years, nor was there any evidence of interactions between the several exposures considered. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Helen Koechlin, Carolina Donado, Joe Kossowsky
Duration: 5:16
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
In our article, we examined data collected by the National Institute of Child Health and Development for the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. This longitudinal cohort followed more than 1,000 children and their families from the child’s birth until the age of 15. Our findings highlight the importance of the context within which a child grows up: not only the family context and the mental health of parents, but also the peer context and friendships are important influences that help decide whether a child develops adjustment problems or not in the face of stressful life events. Read the article.
Creator: C. Thomas Lewis, IUPUI School of Informatics and Computing
Duration: 4:34
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
Lead author, Nerissa Bauer, MD, MPH presents findings of the second randomized controlled trial for TEACH (Tailoring Education for ADHD and Children’s Health), a family intervention delivered over 5 sessions to small groups of children with ADHD and their parents during follow up visits to the clinic. Participants in TEACH reported greater improvements in parental emotional health, child functioning in the home and several quality of life indicators compared to families receiving follow up care as individual visits. Our findings provide ongoing support for further research and refinement of the TEACH intervention. Read the article.
Creator: Joseph Smith
Duration: 5:12
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
CDC’s Dr. Lisa Wiggins discusses research findings on wandering among preschool children with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from the Study to Explore Early Development, or SEED. SEED is currently the largest study in the United States to help identify factors that may put children at risk for ASD and other developmental disabilities.
Creator: Robert Eves
Duration: 4:59
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
Adults born preterm are at risk of attention problems. However, it is currently unclear as to why these problems come about. In this study of two prospective longitudinal cohorts, the BLS and EPICure, the attention problems and potential predictive factors of preterms and controls were assessed. Results highlighted the roles of executive functioning and general cognitive functioning in why preterms display more attention problems than controls, an important finding for potential interventions. Additionally, it highlighted the disparity between self-report, parent-report and experimenter ratings for attention problems with evidence that preterms do not believe themselves to have problems with attention
Creator: Samantha Schilling, MD
Duration: 5:05
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
The efficacy of the group parenting program, Child Adult Relationship Enhancement in Primary-Care (PriCARE), in improving behavior in primary-care patients whose parents had identified a concern for behavior problems was previously demonstrated. In this second RCT, pre-existing behavioral problems were not required for participation, and the efficacy of a peer mentor on improving PriCARE attendance was also evaluated. Both positive parenting (measured by the Parenting Scale), and child behavior (measured by the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory-ECBI) improved in the treatment arms, even though the majority of children had subclinical ECBI scores at baseline. The peer mentor did not impact attendance.
Creator: University of Michigan Health System
Duration: 5:08
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
Dr. Jenny Radesky discusses her qualitative interviews with parents of young children about their mobile device use habits, highlighting the 3 main tensions parents expressed. These included: 1) cognitive tensions, feeling “information overload” and difficulties multitasking between tech and children; 2) emotional tensions, including the feeling that the sometimes “intrusive” nature of mobile media makes it more stress-inducing, but also that they seek it as a way self-regulate when stressed with parenting; 3) dyadic tensions, described as discomfort with how mobile device use during family routines seemed to interrupt moments of connection, but also could act as a peacekeeper.Click here to read the article.
Creator: Connie Campbell
Duration: 2:03
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
Early identification of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is important. We redesigned the model of our ASD clinic for children under 3yrs. One of the changes was the integration of a Level 2 screening tool component, the RITA-T (Rapid Interactive Screening Test for Autism in Toddlers). This study examined the psychometric properties of the RITA-T with concerns related to ASD. In the study group (239 participants), we obtained discriminative psychometric properties (sensitivity: 0.97, specificity 0.71) similar to previously published results by Choueiri. When integrated into an ASD screening and diagnostic process, the RITA-T improves the efficiency and helps predict a best estimate clinical diagnosis of ASD. Read the article.
Creator: Jenny Radesky
Duration: 3:16
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
Jenny Radesky discusses new research on parent mobile device use and parent-child relationships. Her study used the Working Model of the Child Interview (WMCI) to assess maternal mental representations of her child's emotions and experiences, and studied associations with how frequently mothers spontaneously used their mobile devices during videotaped parent-child eating encounters. Read the article.
Creator: Pascal Burger
Duration: 3:44
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
We examined how the level and concordance of non-responsive feeding practices between mothers and fathers are associated with child fussy eating in a sample of socioeconomically disadvantaged families. Cohabiting mother-father pairs from the ‘Mums and Dads (MAD) for Mealtimes’ study reported on their non-responsive feeding practices (persuasive feeding, reward for eating and reward for behaviour) and their preschool-aged child’s fussy eating (i.e., picky eating). Less child fussy eating was reported when parents were concordant in avoiding non-responsive feeding practices. Our results highlight the need to use a whole-family approach in research and interventions to address fussy eating. Read the article.
Creator: Carol Duh-Leong
Duration: 2:30
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
Evidence has established the association between risk factors and ADHD severity, but less is known about factors that may have protective effects on clinical, academic, and social outcomes among children with ADHD. This cross sectional study using the 2016 National Survey of Children’s Health examined associations between family cohesion, caregiver social support, community support and 1) ADHD severity, 2) school engagement, and 3) difficulty making or keeping friends. Among children with ADHD, family cohesion and community support show protective effects in clinical, academic and social outcomes.
Creator: Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota
Duration: 4:47
Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
First-author Melissa Engel discusses the longitudinal relationship between somatic complaints, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in a sample of young children at increased familial risk for psychopathology. Maternal psychopathology was found to be a risk factor for somatic complaints. Moreover, somatic complaints at preschool predicted somatic complaints, anxiety, and depression at school-age. Symptoms of internalizing disorders may be evident as early as the preschool years, suggesting the potential utility of early detection and intervention efforts, especially for young children at increased familial risk for internalizing disorders. Pediatric primary care is an ideal setting to integrate preventive efforts. Read the article.
Show: