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Expert Commentary: Indoor Tanning by Teens Linked to Unhealthy Weight Control Methods

Video Author: Carolyn E. Ievers-Landis, Ph.D
Published on: 05.02.2014
Associated with: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics. 35(3):165-171, April 2014

Associate Editor Carolyn E. Ievers-Landis, Ph.D offers commentary on the subject of tanning and the link to unhealthy weight control behaviors.

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Brazilian specialists in neurodevelopment in infants and children together with researchers in pediatric infection disease followed a group of children with presumed congenital Zika virus infection. The study was designed to describe the gross motor trajectory during their first 2 years of life. Most of the children presented changes in their gross motor development up to18 months and remained stable in the following month. At the end of the study all participants were diagnosed with cerebral palsy and the majority experienced severe motor impairment according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS).
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Children born to opioid-dependent mothers are at high risk for poor growth and neonatal withdrawal, but little is known about their longer term outcomes. We examined the health and neurodevelopmental outcomes of a cohort of 100 children born to opioid dependent mothers during pregnancy. These mothers and children were followed prospectively from pregnancy to age 4.5 years alongside a comparison group of 110 randomly identified non-methadone-exposed children and their mothers. Findings highlight the complex developmental needs of these children. The risk of later problems was higher for male children born to higher social risk mothers who used more licit and illicit substances during pregnancy and when children were raised in lower quality home environments. Read the article.
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We screened children at the main referral hospital in Rwanda using the Pediatric Symptom Checklist, translated into Kinyarwanda. Among 300 eligible children, 235 were recruited; none refused. PSC scores were positive in 74/234 cases; 28 of these children completed mental health assessments; 16 of these required treatment or further assessment. Screening sensitivity was 100%, specificity 71%, with favorable receiver operating curve characteristics and internal consistency. In a multivariate analysis, higher PSC scores were associated with outpatient care, CNS trauma or infection, and indices of malnutrition, and with the use of traditional, complementary and alternative medicine. Read the article.
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We sought to develop an improved understanding of attitudes and beliefs surrounding play among families who live in predominantly low-income urban communities. Utilizing qualitative methods, our results demonstrated caregivers of young children describe many important benefits of play. Yet they have misconceptions regarding use of toys and media in promoting development as well as notable barriers to participating in play, which may be opportunities for intervention. Public health programs may be more effectively implemented if they consider these attitudes to develop new or refine existing strategies for promoting parent-child learning activities. Read the article.
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Shared reading practices and early literacy promotion in the first year of life. A summary of our publication detailing reading habits of families with infants during the first year of life. Read the article.
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The objective of our cross-sectional study was to assess the interactions between Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM). As presented in this video and the article itself, ADHD is associated with unfavorable diabetes control with higher HbA1C levels and poor general health status. Although further research is needed, our data suggest that this group requires special care and attention of the medical staff. Read the article.
Creator: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Duration: 5:52
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Read the video transcript.
Creator: Ursula Brain, Rob Lyons
Duration: 5:23
This study examined the impact of prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants and maternal depressed mood symptoms on markers of adiposity, dietary intake, and physical activity in 6 year olds. Maternal depression symptoms were assessed pre- and postnatally. Physical activity was assessed using maternal report and 3-day dietary total food intake were obtained using objective records. Birth weight, weight, height, and waist circumference at age 6 years were also collected. We found that prenatal SSRI exposure was associated with lower reports of physical activity, but was not associated with total diet energy intake or markers of adiposity. Read the article.
Creator: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
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Creator: University of Maryland
Duration: 2:00
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Duration: 2:30
Evidence has established the association between risk factors and ADHD severity, but less is known about factors that may have protective effects on clinical, academic, and social outcomes among children with ADHD. This cross sectional study using the 2016 National Survey of Children’s Health examined associations between family cohesion, caregiver social support, community support and 1) ADHD severity, 2) school engagement, and 3) difficulty making or keeping friends. Among children with ADHD, family cohesion and community support show protective effects in clinical, academic and social outcomes.
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Creator: Rob Stowell, University of Canterbury
Duration: 2:54
Children born to opioid-dependent mothers are at high risk for poor growth and neonatal withdrawal, but little is known about their longer term outcomes. We examined the health and neurodevelopmental outcomes of a cohort of 100 children born to opioid dependent mothers during pregnancy. These mothers and children were followed prospectively from pregnancy to age 4.5 years alongside a comparison group of 110 randomly identified non-methadone-exposed children and their mothers. Findings highlight the complex developmental needs of these children. The risk of later problems was higher for male children born to higher social risk mothers who used more licit and illicit substances during pregnancy and when children were raised in lower quality home environments. Read the article.
Creator: Jean Paul Rukabyarwema
Duration: 4:38
We screened children at the main referral hospital in Rwanda using the Pediatric Symptom Checklist, translated into Kinyarwanda. Among 300 eligible children, 235 were recruited; none refused. PSC scores were positive in 74/234 cases; 28 of these children completed mental health assessments; 16 of these required treatment or further assessment. Screening sensitivity was 100%, specificity 71%, with favorable receiver operating curve characteristics and internal consistency. In a multivariate analysis, higher PSC scores were associated with outpatient care, CNS trauma or infection, and indices of malnutrition, and with the use of traditional, complementary and alternative medicine. Read the article.
Creator: Michelle Greene
Duration: 4:25
Mothers of very low birth weight infants (VLBW, birth weight less than 3 pounds, 5 ounces) experience maternal psychological distress, defined as depression, anxiety and perinatal post-traumatic stress (PPTS).This study estimated maternal distress at time of VLBW infants' birth, modeled change in distress over VLBW infants' first year of life, and examined predictors of distress. Distress declined over VLBW infants' first year of life. Mothers residing in lower income environments had lower PPTS and anxiety at VLBW infant birth. VLBW birth weight and maternal age, respectively, predicted change in anxiety over time, and change in depression over time. Read the article.
Creator: Philip Bertulfo
Duration: 4:25
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Creator: Jessica VanOrmer, M.A.
Duration: 2:30
This study included 2,083 parents of children from the 2016 National Survey of Children’s health database. We examined the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and family resilience, including how these differed by diagnostic category (autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), comorbid ASD and ADHD, and neurotypically developing children). We found that ADHD children experienced significantly more ACEs and children with comorbid ASD and ADHD had the lowest levels of family resilience when controlling for demographic variables and ACEs. Further, as the number of ACEs increased, family resilience decreased. Results have implications for early intervention services. Read the article.
Creator: Kelly E. Rea
Duration: 4:17
This study sought to examine the use of one Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) screening tool, the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers- Revised (MCHAT-R), in a racially and ethnically diverse urban pediatric clinic, to review screening rates and referral practices. Screening completion was significantly related to child age, and there was a greater rate of positive screenings for Hispanic vs. non-Hispanic children. Referrals were highly variable across positive screenings. Ethnic disparities in ASD positive screening rates and inconsistent referrals represent a critical issue in current pediatric practice. Implications and future directions for research and clinical practice are discussed. Read the article.
Creator: M. Jackson Wilkinson and Carol L. Wilkinson
Duration: 3:45
Primary care providers and parents rely on developmental milestone checklists as tools for tracking a child’s development. However, there are multiple published milestone checklists that vary in their structure and content. Our team systematically evaluated the consistency and variability between four commonly used milestone checklists. We found that there was limited overlap in the content across these four checklists. In addition, the milestones shared across checklists were inconsistent in their estimated ages of when milestones should occur. Our findings highlight the need for objectively defined and accurately normed developmental milestones. Read the article.
Creator: Jon Izaguirre, Xavier Vall, Dolores Miguel-Ruiz, Jose A. Alda, and Anna Huguet
Duration: 2:37
72 children aged 7-12 years with ADHD were randomized in two groups (mindfulness and control) with the aim to investigate efficacy of a structured mindfulness group intervention program targeting ADHD core symptoms and difficulties in emotion regulation. This study provides evidence supporting mindfulness as a useful intervention modality for the treatment of ADHD. Read the article.
Creator: Bill Hamilton
Duration: 3:15
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Creator: Ursula Brain, Rob Lyons
Duration: 5:23
This study examined the impact of prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants and maternal depressed mood symptoms on markers of adiposity, dietary intake, and physical activity in 6 year olds. Maternal depression symptoms were assessed pre- and postnatally. Physical activity was assessed using maternal report and 3-day dietary total food intake were obtained using objective records. Birth weight, weight, height, and waist circumference at age 6 years were also collected. We found that prenatal SSRI exposure was associated with lower reports of physical activity, but was not associated with total diet energy intake or markers of adiposity. Read the article.
Creator: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Duration: 5:28
Researchers conducted a multi-site, randomized controlled trial to examine the impact of the Legacy for Children program on child health and development. Results revealed Legacy has a positive impact on child emotional and behavioral outcomes, child IQ, and mother-child interactions. Read the article.
Creator: Theodora Nelson, Patricia East, Cecilia Rhodes, and Rich Fancher
Duration: 4:12
We hypothesized that different parenting styles of children with inattentive and hyperactive behaviors would affect a child’s later behaviors and have important implications for how physician’s educate parents. Analyzing data from a large, longitudinal cohort study of Chilean children, we looked at the frequency of children’s hyperactive and inattentive symptoms at age 5, mother’s nurturant and, separately, hostile parenting at child’s age 10, and substance use and aggression at adolescence. Our study findings support the idea that mother’s frequent hostile and, separately, lower nurturant parenting of hyperactive and inattentive children is related to children’s higher risk behaviors in adolescence. Read the article.
Creator: University of Maryland
Duration: 2:00
The use of actigraphy and sleep diary measures has been understudied in low-income families who are at increased risk of poor sleep. In our study, we compared these measures in a low-income sample and identified if toddlers were meeting National Sleep Foundation recommendations of bedtime before 9pm and 11-14 hours of sleep/day. We found that (1) sleep diary measures did not match actigraphy measures, (2) toddlers were going to bed past 9pm, and (3) toddlers were not getting enough sleep. Given our small sample, these results need to be replicated before they can be generalized to other low-income families. Read the article.
Creator: Dr. Elizabeth White, Dr. Rebecca Scharf, and Stephanie Fielding
Duration: 3:39
We analyzed data from 9,971 children who participated in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten: 2011, a nationally representative cohort of children entering kindergarten in the United States in 2010-2011. We examined the longitudinal relationships between performing chores in kindergarten and child perceived self-competence measures and academic outcomes in the third grade. Our study is unique in that we looked at how early childhood chores relate to development from a child’s own perspective. Performing chores in early elementary school was associated with later development of self-competence, pro-social behavior, and self-efficacy. Read the article.
Creator: Andrej Kopac
Duration: 5:47
Increased television viewing is associated with language delays in early childhood Unlike traditional screen time, mobile media devices offer the opportunity to interact with the interface. Studies examining the relationship between mobile media device use and developmental outcomes including communication outcomes in young children are lacking. The objective of our study was to examine the association between mobile media device use and communication delays in 18-month-old children. Read the article.
Creator: Ami Bax
Duration: 6:46
This study's purpose was to investigate the association between Race/Ethnicity, Socioeconomic, and other Demographic factors and ADHD Diagnosis and Treatment in children. Children who were white, had public insurance (i.e. Medicaid), were male, and raised by single parents appear to have increased access to ADHD diagnostic or medication services. ADHD prevalence was lower among Hispanic children but did not vary among other racial groups. New findings included boys and children raised in single-parent households potentially having higher rates of false positive diagnoses, which warrants further exploration. Read the article.
Creator: Jenny Radesky
Duration: 3:53
Dr. Jenny Radesky and Marisa Meyer discuss their article, Advertising in Children's Apps: A Content Analysis, with sample screen shots illustrating their findings. Read the article.
Creator: Kevin Hunter, Thaddaeus Edwards
Duration:
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Creator: Helen Koechlin, Carolina Donado, Joe Kossowsky
Duration: 5:16
In our article, we examined data collected by the National Institute of Child Health and Development for the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. This longitudinal cohort followed more than 1,000 children and their families from the child’s birth until the age of 15. Our findings highlight the importance of the context within which a child grows up: not only the family context and the mental health of parents, but also the peer context and friendships are important influences that help decide whether a child develops adjustment problems or not in the face of stressful life events. Read the article.
Creator: Catherine A. Taylor and Ken Tyrolf
Duration: 5:12
Pediatricians are one of the most credible professional sources of advice for parents concerning how best to discipline their children. There is now an overwhelming body of scientific evidence that hitting children, even for disciplinary purposes (i.e., spanking or corporal punishment), leads to increased risk of harm to children’s overall health. This study shows that most U.S. pediatricians are aware of this evidence and do not support hitting children for discipline. Pediatricians can play a crucial role in shifting this long-standing, widely held social norm in the U.S. by sharing their views and pointing parents toward alternative forms of discipline. Read the article.
Creator: C. Thomas Lewis, IUPUI School of Informatics and Computing
Duration: 4:34
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Creator: Suzanne Tough
Duration: 3:00
This study examines risk and protective factors associated with externalizing behavior among 1300 children. We found that moms who faced more mental health challenges when their children were two were more likely to report that their children had externalizing behaviors at age three. Children in daycare, or whose moms participated in community activities, such as story time at the library, were less likely to report externalizing behavior in their children. Opportunities for children to practice their self-regulation skills through structured interactions with same age peers can enhance school readiness and should be made accessible to all families. Read the article.
Creator: Sarah Kirsch, David Meryash
Duration: 5:41
Sarah Kirsch, lead author, describes a national study of the determinants of parent satisfaction with emergency or urgent care visits by their children with autism spectrum disorder. The researchers found that the factors most associated with parent satisfaction were indicators of the quality of interpersonal and communication skills of the medical and non-medical staff of the facility at which the patients were treated. These were more important, for example, than patient traits, reason for visit, or whether the patient was cooperative. The authors emphasize the importance of autism-specific training for emergency department staff to maximizing satisfaction with care. Read the article.
Creator: Pascal Burger
Duration: 3:44
We examined how the level and concordance of non-responsive feeding practices between mothers and fathers are associated with child fussy eating in a sample of socioeconomically disadvantaged families. Cohabiting mother-father pairs from the ‘Mums and Dads (MAD) for Mealtimes’ study reported on their non-responsive feeding practices (persuasive feeding, reward for eating and reward for behaviour) and their preschool-aged child’s fussy eating (i.e., picky eating). Less child fussy eating was reported when parents were concordant in avoiding non-responsive feeding practices. Our results highlight the need to use a whole-family approach in research and interventions to address fussy eating. Read the article.
Creator: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
Duration: 4:12
Lead author, Julia Anixt, MD presents findings from a research study evaluating the types of challenging behaviors parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) prioritize for treatment during Developmental Behavioral Pediatric (DBP) clinic visits. This study explores how much shared decision making (SDM) occurs during “usual care” DBP clinic visits, how often parent priorities are addressed in the treatment plan, and how often parents feel uncertain about the decision of whether to use medication to treat their children’s challenging behaviors. Read the article.
Creator: Veni Kandasamy; Krysten Carrera (HRSA's Maternal and Child Health Bureau); Milton Thomas (HRSA's Office of the Administrator)
Duration: 2:34
This is a video abstract for the Parental Perception of Flourishing in School-Aged Children: 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health manuscript. We discuss what flourishing in children is and its importance. We also discuss our data source, HRSA's National Survey of Children's Health. Our study findings that approximately half of school-aged children were found to be flourishing and that differences by sociodemographic factors in the likelihood of flourishing were reduced with the inclusion of environmental factors are also described. We close with next steps and areas for further study in flourishing. Read the article.
Creator: Carol Strong & Meng-Che Tsai
Duration: 5:25
This video is a quick summary of the paper, “Adolescent Internet Use, Social Integration, and Depressive Symptoms: Analysis from a Longitudinal Cohort Survey.” It examined the association between adolescent leisure-time internet use and social connection in the school context, and how this association affects later depressive symptoms among adolescents in Taiwan. The results highlighted the needs for stakeholders of adolescent health to carefully assess adolescents’ social networking and mental well-being. Read the article.
Creator: Jenny Radesky
Duration: 3:16
Jenny Radesky discusses new research on parent mobile device use and parent-child relationships. Her study used the Working Model of the Child Interview (WMCI) to assess maternal mental representations of her child's emotions and experiences, and studied associations with how frequently mothers spontaneously used their mobile devices during videotaped parent-child eating encounters. Read the article.
Creator: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Duration: 4:18
Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) used parent-reported data from national studies in 2007 and 2011 to understand how having Tourette syndrome and other conditions affect how children do in school, like repeating a grade, school problems, or needing special services. Having other conditions along with Tourette Syndrome was related to having difficulty in school and needing educational services. This is important information for healthcare providers, teachers and parents. Being aware of the potential challenges related to both Tourette syndrome and other conditions can help them to best support the child’s education. For further information on CDC’s research in this area, visit: www.cdc.gov/tourette.Read the article.
Creator: Rutgers University
Duration: 5:00
This video discusses results from a study of pediatric residency program training directors across the country. This study was intended to identify perceptions of behavioral health training in pediatric residency programs, degree of involvement from behavioral health providers, and opportunities for/barriers to innovation in training. Despite substantial improvement in residency training in behavioral health over the past decade, additional improvement is needed. Barriers to continued improvement include training content, training methods, support from faculty and administrator stakeholders, and resource issues. Strategies derived from implementation science have the potential to address these barriers. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Seattle Children’s Research Institute
Duration: 6:36
Lead author, Jennifer Gerdts, PhD, discusses the rationale for developing a streamlined and efficient interdisciplinary diagnostic evaluation for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at Seattle Children’s Autism Center (SCAC). Dr. Gerdts compares diagnostic outcomes, follow-up care rates, provider satisfaction, billed time, and reimbursement amounts in interdisciplinary teams to those of more traditional psychology-led and physician-led models. She also suggests benefits of this diagnostic approach for families of children with ASD. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Aleix Cabrera, Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) Video
Duration: 02:43
This study is the first to demonstrate associations between a longer time spent engaging in cognitively stimulating activities and lower scores of both ADHD symptoms and behavior problems, in ADHD-free children at baseline. We also found that sleeping longer was associated with a lower ADHD symptom score. In contrast, time spent watching TV and time spent engaging in physical activity at age 4 years were not associated with ADHD symptoms or behavior problems at age 7 years, nor was there any evidence of interactions between the several exposures considered. Click here to read the article.
Creator: University of Maryland School of Pharmacy
Duration: 5:28
The video abstract highlights the significance and innovation of the research on caregiver preferences for outcomes in youth with mental health multimorbidity. Outcomes were identified in partnership with caregivers to include the range of outcome domains beyond clinical factors that are relevant when making treatment decisions. Best-Worst Scaling is a preference elicitation method where caregivers jointly considered multiple attributes related to treatment outcomes and selected the one most important to them, much as they do real life decisions. This work moves beyond a sole focus on disease-specific outcomes, and provides insight into the outcome priorities that influence treatment decisions. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Melissa Bright, Lindsay Thompson
Duration: 3:22
Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and physical, mental, and developmental health conditions Video Creator: Christopher Gomez, University of Florida. Read the article
Creator: Megan Narad, Jessica King
Duration:
We report on the rate need for academic services and academic service utilization among a cohort of children who sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI) between the ages of 3 and 7 years old, as they transitioned to middle school, approximately 6.8 years after injury. Findings show the need for services among students with a history TBI remains high even years after injury. Rates of unmet need were high across all injury groups (46.2%-63.6%), underscoring the importance of continued monitoring of students with a history of TBI, especially children with less severe injuries who are at risk for being underserved. Read the article
Creator: Natacha Akshoomoff, Ph.D.
Duration: 3:56
We analyzed follow-up data at age 10 years from children who participated in the Extremely Low Gestational Age Newborns Study - also known as a the ELGAN study. Complete data were available from 668 children who were born at less than 28 weeks gestation and who did not have intellectual disability at age 10. We found that about 30% of these children had low achievement in math, reading, or both. As predicted, the rate of having a Math Learning Disability was twice as high as having a Reading Learning Disability. The pattern of deficits on neuropsychological tests varied as a function of learning disability type. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Peter Palumbo
Duration: 4:32
Electronic health record data was collected from 3 DBPNet sites in order to look at variations in prescribing practices and factors associated with Developmental-behavioral pediatricians prescribing psychotropic medication to children with ASD. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Mission Health System Audio-Visual Support
Duration: 6:20
This video describes the initial development of the Clinical Functional Impairment Scale (CFIS). The CFIS was developed because of the lack of an efficient and flexible measure of functional outcomes in Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics. We describe the importance of shared-decision-making in the clinical use of the CFIS. Focus groups and qualitative methods were used to establish content validity. Inter-rater reliability was assessed with a convenience sample of DBP clinicians who responded to a survey on the SDBP Discussion Board in which case vignettes were presented. The video describes future development and goals for dissemination of the CFIS. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Wilko Duprez
Duration: 4:51
This longitudinal study assessed the intellectual, academic and executive functioning skills of children diagnosed with ADHD at diagnosis and four years later. Intellectual function was stable over the four-year interval. Reliable change analyses highlighted variability in academic performance, with half the children showing performance declines in at least one academic subject. Executive functions followed a generally stable or improving course. There was some evidence of better neurocognitive performance in those with partial symptom remission at follow up, however early cognitive functioning did not predict symptom outcome over time. Findings emphasize the importance of monitoring academic performance in children with ADHD. Click here to read the article.
Creator: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Duration: 5:51
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Clinical guidelines provide recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), with specific guidance on caring for children younger than 6 years. This exploratory study describes ADHD diagnosis and treatment patterns among young children in the U.S. using two nationally representative parent surveys. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Luke Walton & Tugce Bilgin
Duration: 4:58
We report on the findings of a longitudinal study that followed very preterm/very low birth weight and full-term mother-infant dyads from birth to 18 months. We assessed both infant feeding problems and maternal sensitive parenting at term, 3 and 18 months and examined the direction of the associations between both. Results showed that the association between maternal sensitivity and feeding problems differed in very preterm and full-term mother-infant dyads. In full-term infants, there was a reciprocal association from 3 to 18 months; while in very preterm infants, higher feeding problems decreased maternal sensitivity over time. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Batya Elbaum
Duration: 6:06
Early intervention programs under Part C of the Individuals with Disability Education Act serve a developmentally heterogeneous population of children ages birth to 36 months,. Applying mixture modeling to developmental assessment data from 1513 children who participated in a large, urban early intervention program, we identified four subgroups of children with distinct developmental profiles. Children's developmental trajectories differed by subgroup; children in the subgroup displaying severe delays in communication, with less severe delays in other areas of functioning, had the highest likelihood of persistent delays. Our study describes the identified subgroups and suggests implications for clinical practice and service planning. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Corinna Jenkins Tucker, Ph.D., C.F.L.E.
Duration: 5:25
This video is a brief summary of the paper, “Victimization by Siblings in Children with Disability or Weight Problems”. Using a national probability sample and controlling for other forms of maltreatment and individual and family characteristics, analyses showed that children with a physical disability and parent-perceived children who are thinner than average and children who are overweight experienced more sibling victimization. Children with an internalizing disorder experienced less sibling victimization. This the first study to highlight the importance of screening for sibling victimization in families of children with a disability and/or non-normative weight status. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Megan Scott
Duration: 5:04
This video is a brief summary of the paper, “Neurocognitive correlates of ADHD symptoms in children born at extremely low gestational age”. Compared to children born near term, those born extremely preterm are at much higher risk for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Using the data from the Extremely Low Gestational Age Newborn study (ELGAN), we examined the neurocognitive correlates of ADHD symptoms in ELGANs at 10 years of age. Findings indicate that among children born extremely preterm, those with ADHD symptoms are more likely than others to have global neurocognitive impairment as well as deficits in executive functioning skills and poor academic achievement. Click here to read the article.
Creator: OHSU Media Relations
Duration: 5:00
This video describes a study that assesses the relationship between autism-related health and educational service use and severity in a national survey of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The study found that although rates of service use were generally highest among children with severe ASD, non-school-based therapy and behavioral interventions were only used by about half of children with severe ASD, and about 1 in 4 children with mild ASD were using none of the therapies asked about. Study findings suggest that many children with ASD are likely not getting all of the therapy services they need, across all levels of severity. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Dr. Marisa Toomey
Duration: 3:54
The peer interactions of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are of particular interest to many physicians and researchers who work with children who have ASD. The PROMIS Pediatric Parent-Proxy Peer Relationships Measure was validated in a general pediatric population, but it had not been previously studied in children with ASD. Clinicians from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Boston Children's Hospital, and The Children's Hospital at Montefiore collaborated to evaluate the existing PROMIS Peer Relationships Measure in a population of children with ASD. In this video, Dr. Marisa Toomey highlights the potential significance of the study. Click here to read the article.
Creator: University of Michigan Health System
Duration: 5:08
Dr. Jenny Radesky discusses her qualitative interviews with parents of young children about their mobile device use habits, highlighting the 3 main tensions parents expressed. These included: 1) cognitive tensions, feeling “information overload” and difficulties multitasking between tech and children; 2) emotional tensions, including the feeling that the sometimes “intrusive” nature of mobile media makes it more stress-inducing, but also that they seek it as a way self-regulate when stressed with parenting; 3) dyadic tensions, described as discomfort with how mobile device use during family routines seemed to interrupt moments of connection, but also could act as a peacekeeper.Click here to read the article.
Creator: Nanette Gartrell, MD and Dee Mosbacher MD PhD
Duration: 4:01
Using the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children’s Health dataset, we compared spouse/partner relationships and parent-child relationships (family relationships), parenting stress, and children’s general health, emotional difficulties, coping behavior, and learning behavior (child outcomes) in households of same-sex (female) versus different-sex continuously coupled parents with biological offspring. We assessed whether associations among family relationships, parenting stress, and child outcomes were different in the two household types. We found that children with female same-sex parents and different-sex parents demonstrated no differences in outcomes, despite female same-sex parents reporting more parenting stress. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Deborah Christensen, PhD
Duration: 5:58
Population-based autism spectrum disorder (ASD) surveillance among 4-year old children provides valuable information about the early identification of children with ASD and suggests progression toward lowering the age of first ASD evaluation within participating Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring communities. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Carolyn E. Ievers-Landis, Ph.D
Duration: 1:09
Associate Editor Carolyn E. Ievers-Landis, Ph.D offers commentary on the subject of tanning and the link to unhealthy weight control behaviors.