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Video Abstract: The Legacy for Children™ randomized control trial: Effects on cognition through third grade for young children experiencing poverty

Video Author: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Published on: 03.29.2019

Researchers conducted a multi-site, randomized controlled trial to examine the impact of the Legacy for Children program on child health and development. Results revealed Legacy has a positive impact on child emotional and behavioral outcomes, child IQ, and mother-child interactions. Read the article.

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Creator: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Duration: 5:52
Together with colleagues at the Brazilian Ministry of Health, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducted the Zika Outcomes and Development in Infants and Children, or ZODIAC, investigation following up with children conceived during the 2015-2016 Zika virus outbreak in Brazil, as well as their primary caregivers. The investigation was designed to document the health and development of children with evidence of congenital Zika virus infection as they approached toddlerhood and the impact on their families. Some children exposed to Zika before birth may have complex health and developmental challenges requiring specialized care throughout their lives. Read the article.

Read the video transcript.
Creator: Ursula Brain, Rob Lyons
Duration: 5:23
This study examined the impact of prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants and maternal depressed mood symptoms on markers of adiposity, dietary intake, and physical activity in 6 year olds. Maternal depression symptoms were assessed pre- and postnatally. Physical activity was assessed using maternal report and 3-day dietary total food intake were obtained using objective records. Birth weight, weight, height, and waist circumference at age 6 years were also collected. We found that prenatal SSRI exposure was associated with lower reports of physical activity, but was not associated with total diet energy intake or markers of adiposity. Read the article.
Creator: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Duration: 5:28
Researchers conducted a multi-site, randomized controlled trial to examine the impact of the Legacy for Children program on child health and development. Results revealed Legacy has a positive impact on child emotional and behavioral outcomes, child IQ, and mother-child interactions. Read the article.
Creator: Richard Watson, UNMC Public Relations
Duration: 4:53
Behavioral health issues routinely present during primary care visits. To address this, behavioral health providers have been integrating into primary care to improve access to care. This study provides preliminary evidence that offering behavioral health services in pediatric primary care settings results in youth accessing services sooner when symptoms are less severe. While disruptive behavior disorders were the most frequent presenting problem, youth with anxiety disorders were more likely to access services when receiving services within their pediatrician’s office. Read the article.
Creator: Theodora Nelson, Patricia East, Cecilia Rhodes, and Rich Fancher
Duration: 4:12
We hypothesized that different parenting styles of children with inattentive and hyperactive behaviors would affect a child’s later behaviors and have important implications for how physician’s educate parents. Analyzing data from a large, longitudinal cohort study of Chilean children, we looked at the frequency of children’s hyperactive and inattentive symptoms at age 5, mother’s nurturant and, separately, hostile parenting at child’s age 10, and substance use and aggression at adolescence. Our study findings support the idea that mother’s frequent hostile and, separately, lower nurturant parenting of hyperactive and inattentive children is related to children’s higher risk behaviors in adolescence. Read the article.
Creator: University of Maryland
Duration: 2:00
The use of actigraphy and sleep diary measures has been understudied in low-income families who are at increased risk of poor sleep. In our study, we compared these measures in a low-income sample and identified if toddlers were meeting National Sleep Foundation recommendations of bedtime before 9pm and 11-14 hours of sleep/day. We found that (1) sleep diary measures did not match actigraphy measures, (2) toddlers were going to bed past 9pm, and (3) toddlers were not getting enough sleep. Given our small sample, these results need to be replicated before they can be generalized to other low-income families. Read the article.
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We analyzed data from 9,971 children who participated in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten: 2011, a nationally representative cohort of children entering kindergarten in the United States in 2010-2011. We examined the longitudinal relationships between performing chores in kindergarten and child perceived self-competence measures and academic outcomes in the third grade. Our study is unique in that we looked at how early childhood chores relate to development from a child’s own perspective. Performing chores in early elementary school was associated with later development of self-competence, pro-social behavior, and self-efficacy. Read the article.
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Duration: 5:47
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Duration: 6:46
This study's purpose was to investigate the association between Race/Ethnicity, Socioeconomic, and other Demographic factors and ADHD Diagnosis and Treatment in children. Children who were white, had public insurance (i.e. Medicaid), were male, and raised by single parents appear to have increased access to ADHD diagnostic or medication services. ADHD prevalence was lower among Hispanic children but did not vary among other racial groups. New findings included boys and children raised in single-parent households potentially having higher rates of false positive diagnoses, which warrants further exploration. Read the article.
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Duration: 3:53
Dr. Jenny Radesky and Marisa Meyer discuss their article, Advertising in Children's Apps: A Content Analysis, with sample screen shots illustrating their findings. Read the article.
Creator: Philip Curtis
Duration: 3:33
The goal of this paper is to investigate the association between the two most commonly reported parental concerns about young children - disruptive behavior (e.g., irritable, aggressive, and noncompliant behaviors) and language delay in toddlers. Stronger language skills were associated with fewer disruptive behavior for children between 18 and 36 months of age. This negative association was stronger for girls than boys and stronger for children living in poverty than those above the poverty line. Findings from our study suggest a developmental co-occurrence pattern that begins at a very early age. Read the article.
Creator: Kevin Hunter, Thaddaeus Edwards
Duration:
This video describes findings from a randomized controlled trial of Pathways Triple P behavioral parent training intervention. This program was delivered to families receiving child welfare services for child maltreatment. Child outcomes were measured using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL 4.0). Findings indicate significant improvements in child health-related quality of life. Read the article.
Creator: Chloe Beacham
Duration: 5:34
First-author Chloe Beacham discusses findings from the article “Screening for Autism Spectrum Disorder: Profiles of Children Who Are Missed”. Screening measures such as the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers, Revised (M-CHAT-R) and the Ages and Stages Questionnaire, 3rd Edition (ASQ-3) are parent-report questionnaires that target autism symptomatology and broad developmental delays respectively. This study sought to examine the profiles of children with autism spectrum disorder who are missed by these commonly used screening measures and also to build upon the current literature on the benefits of a combined screening approach. Read the article.
Creator: Eric Rubenstein
Duration:
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Creator: Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota
Duration: 4:47
First-author Melissa Engel discusses the longitudinal relationship between somatic complaints, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in a sample of young children at increased familial risk for psychopathology. Maternal psychopathology was found to be a risk factor for somatic complaints. Moreover, somatic complaints at preschool predicted somatic complaints, anxiety, and depression at school-age. Symptoms of internalizing disorders may be evident as early as the preschool years, suggesting the potential utility of early detection and intervention efforts, especially for young children at increased familial risk for internalizing disorders. Pediatric primary care is an ideal setting to integrate preventive efforts. Read the article.
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Pediatricians are one of the most credible professional sources of advice for parents concerning how best to discipline their children. There is now an overwhelming body of scientific evidence that hitting children, even for disciplinary purposes (i.e., spanking or corporal punishment), leads to increased risk of harm to children’s overall health. This study shows that most U.S. pediatricians are aware of this evidence and do not support hitting children for discipline. Pediatricians can play a crucial role in shifting this long-standing, widely held social norm in the U.S. by sharing their views and pointing parents toward alternative forms of discipline. Read the article.
Creator: C. Thomas Lewis, IUPUI School of Informatics and Computing
Duration: 4:34
Lead author, Nerissa Bauer, MD, MPH presents findings of the second randomized controlled trial for TEACH (Tailoring Education for ADHD and Children’s Health), a family intervention delivered over 5 sessions to small groups of children with ADHD and their parents during follow up visits to the clinic. Participants in TEACH reported greater improvements in parental emotional health, child functioning in the home and several quality of life indicators compared to families receiving follow up care as individual visits. Our findings provide ongoing support for further research and refinement of the TEACH intervention. Read the article.
Creator: Suzanne Tough
Duration: 3:00
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Creator: Dr. Michal Vinker Shuster
Duration: 3:30
The objective of our cross-sectional study was to assess the interactions between Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM). As presented in this video and the article itself, ADHD is associated with unfavorable diabetes control with higher HbA1C levels and poor general health status. Although further research is needed, our data suggest that this group requires special care and attention of the medical staff.
Creator: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Duration: 5:52
Together with colleagues at the Brazilian Ministry of Health, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducted the Zika Outcomes and Development in Infants and Children, or ZODIAC, investigation following up with children conceived during the 2015-2016 Zika virus outbreak in Brazil, as well as their primary caregivers. The investigation was designed to document the health and development of children with evidence of congenital Zika virus infection as they approached toddlerhood and the impact on their families. Some children exposed to Zika before birth may have complex health and developmental challenges requiring specialized care throughout their lives. Read the article.

Read the video transcript.
Creator: Ursula Brain, Rob Lyons
Duration: 5:23
This study examined the impact of prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants and maternal depressed mood symptoms on markers of adiposity, dietary intake, and physical activity in 6 year olds. Maternal depression symptoms were assessed pre- and postnatally. Physical activity was assessed using maternal report and 3-day dietary total food intake were obtained using objective records. Birth weight, weight, height, and waist circumference at age 6 years were also collected. We found that prenatal SSRI exposure was associated with lower reports of physical activity, but was not associated with total diet energy intake or markers of adiposity. Read the article.
Creator: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Duration: 5:28
Researchers conducted a multi-site, randomized controlled trial to examine the impact of the Legacy for Children program on child health and development. Results revealed Legacy has a positive impact on child emotional and behavioral outcomes, child IQ, and mother-child interactions. Read the article.
Creator: Richard Watson, UNMC Public Relations
Duration: 4:53
Behavioral health issues routinely present during primary care visits. To address this, behavioral health providers have been integrating into primary care to improve access to care. This study provides preliminary evidence that offering behavioral health services in pediatric primary care settings results in youth accessing services sooner when symptoms are less severe. While disruptive behavior disorders were the most frequent presenting problem, youth with anxiety disorders were more likely to access services when receiving services within their pediatrician’s office. Read the article.
Creator: Theodora Nelson, Patricia East, Cecilia Rhodes, and Rich Fancher
Duration: 4:12
We hypothesized that different parenting styles of children with inattentive and hyperactive behaviors would affect a child’s later behaviors and have important implications for how physician’s educate parents. Analyzing data from a large, longitudinal cohort study of Chilean children, we looked at the frequency of children’s hyperactive and inattentive symptoms at age 5, mother’s nurturant and, separately, hostile parenting at child’s age 10, and substance use and aggression at adolescence. Our study findings support the idea that mother’s frequent hostile and, separately, lower nurturant parenting of hyperactive and inattentive children is related to children’s higher risk behaviors in adolescence. Read the article.
Creator: University of Maryland
Duration: 2:00
The use of actigraphy and sleep diary measures has been understudied in low-income families who are at increased risk of poor sleep. In our study, we compared these measures in a low-income sample and identified if toddlers were meeting National Sleep Foundation recommendations of bedtime before 9pm and 11-14 hours of sleep/day. We found that (1) sleep diary measures did not match actigraphy measures, (2) toddlers were going to bed past 9pm, and (3) toddlers were not getting enough sleep. Given our small sample, these results need to be replicated before they can be generalized to other low-income families. Read the article.
Creator: Dr. Elizabeth White, Dr. Rebecca Scharf, and Stephanie Fielding
Duration: 3:39
We analyzed data from 9,971 children who participated in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten: 2011, a nationally representative cohort of children entering kindergarten in the United States in 2010-2011. We examined the longitudinal relationships between performing chores in kindergarten and child perceived self-competence measures and academic outcomes in the third grade. Our study is unique in that we looked at how early childhood chores relate to development from a child’s own perspective. Performing chores in early elementary school was associated with later development of self-competence, pro-social behavior, and self-efficacy. Read the article.
Creator: Andrej Kopac
Duration: 5:47
Increased television viewing is associated with language delays in early childhood Unlike traditional screen time, mobile media devices offer the opportunity to interact with the interface. Studies examining the relationship between mobile media device use and developmental outcomes including communication outcomes in young children are lacking. The objective of our study was to examine the association between mobile media device use and communication delays in 18-month-old children. Read the article.
Creator: Ami Bax
Duration: 6:46
This study's purpose was to investigate the association between Race/Ethnicity, Socioeconomic, and other Demographic factors and ADHD Diagnosis and Treatment in children. Children who were white, had public insurance (i.e. Medicaid), were male, and raised by single parents appear to have increased access to ADHD diagnostic or medication services. ADHD prevalence was lower among Hispanic children but did not vary among other racial groups. New findings included boys and children raised in single-parent households potentially having higher rates of false positive diagnoses, which warrants further exploration. Read the article.
Creator: Jenny Radesky
Duration: 3:53
Dr. Jenny Radesky and Marisa Meyer discuss their article, Advertising in Children's Apps: A Content Analysis, with sample screen shots illustrating their findings. Read the article.
Creator: Philip Curtis
Duration: 3:33
The goal of this paper is to investigate the association between the two most commonly reported parental concerns about young children - disruptive behavior (e.g., irritable, aggressive, and noncompliant behaviors) and language delay in toddlers. Stronger language skills were associated with fewer disruptive behavior for children between 18 and 36 months of age. This negative association was stronger for girls than boys and stronger for children living in poverty than those above the poverty line. Findings from our study suggest a developmental co-occurrence pattern that begins at a very early age. Read the article.
Creator: Kevin Hunter, Thaddaeus Edwards
Duration:
This video describes findings from a randomized controlled trial of Pathways Triple P behavioral parent training intervention. This program was delivered to families receiving child welfare services for child maltreatment. Child outcomes were measured using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL 4.0). Findings indicate significant improvements in child health-related quality of life. Read the article.
Creator: Chloe Beacham
Duration: 5:34
First-author Chloe Beacham discusses findings from the article “Screening for Autism Spectrum Disorder: Profiles of Children Who Are Missed”. Screening measures such as the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers, Revised (M-CHAT-R) and the Ages and Stages Questionnaire, 3rd Edition (ASQ-3) are parent-report questionnaires that target autism symptomatology and broad developmental delays respectively. This study sought to examine the profiles of children with autism spectrum disorder who are missed by these commonly used screening measures and also to build upon the current literature on the benefits of a combined screening approach. Read the article.
Creator: Helen Koechlin, Carolina Donado, Joe Kossowsky
Duration: 5:16
In our article, we examined data collected by the National Institute of Child Health and Development for the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. This longitudinal cohort followed more than 1,000 children and their families from the child’s birth until the age of 15. Our findings highlight the importance of the context within which a child grows up: not only the family context and the mental health of parents, but also the peer context and friendships are important influences that help decide whether a child develops adjustment problems or not in the face of stressful life events. Read the article.
Creator: Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota
Duration: 4:47
First-author Melissa Engel discusses the longitudinal relationship between somatic complaints, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in a sample of young children at increased familial risk for psychopathology. Maternal psychopathology was found to be a risk factor for somatic complaints. Moreover, somatic complaints at preschool predicted somatic complaints, anxiety, and depression at school-age. Symptoms of internalizing disorders may be evident as early as the preschool years, suggesting the potential utility of early detection and intervention efforts, especially for young children at increased familial risk for internalizing disorders. Pediatric primary care is an ideal setting to integrate preventive efforts. Read the article.
Creator: Catherine A. Taylor and Ken Tyrolf
Duration: 5:12
Pediatricians are one of the most credible professional sources of advice for parents concerning how best to discipline their children. There is now an overwhelming body of scientific evidence that hitting children, even for disciplinary purposes (i.e., spanking or corporal punishment), leads to increased risk of harm to children’s overall health. This study shows that most U.S. pediatricians are aware of this evidence and do not support hitting children for discipline. Pediatricians can play a crucial role in shifting this long-standing, widely held social norm in the U.S. by sharing their views and pointing parents toward alternative forms of discipline. Read the article.
Creator: C. Thomas Lewis, IUPUI School of Informatics and Computing
Duration: 4:34
Lead author, Nerissa Bauer, MD, MPH presents findings of the second randomized controlled trial for TEACH (Tailoring Education for ADHD and Children’s Health), a family intervention delivered over 5 sessions to small groups of children with ADHD and their parents during follow up visits to the clinic. Participants in TEACH reported greater improvements in parental emotional health, child functioning in the home and several quality of life indicators compared to families receiving follow up care as individual visits. Our findings provide ongoing support for further research and refinement of the TEACH intervention. Read the article.
Creator: Suzanne Tough
Duration: 3:00
This study examines risk and protective factors associated with externalizing behavior among 1300 children. We found that moms who faced more mental health challenges when their children were two were more likely to report that their children had externalizing behaviors at age three. Children in daycare, or whose moms participated in community activities, such as story time at the library, were less likely to report externalizing behavior in their children. Opportunities for children to practice their self-regulation skills through structured interactions with same age peers can enhance school readiness and should be made accessible to all families. Read the article.
Creator: Pascal Burger
Duration: 3:44
We examined how the level and concordance of non-responsive feeding practices between mothers and fathers are associated with child fussy eating in a sample of socioeconomically disadvantaged families. Cohabiting mother-father pairs from the ‘Mums and Dads (MAD) for Mealtimes’ study reported on their non-responsive feeding practices (persuasive feeding, reward for eating and reward for behaviour) and their preschool-aged child’s fussy eating (i.e., picky eating). Less child fussy eating was reported when parents were concordant in avoiding non-responsive feeding practices. Our results highlight the need to use a whole-family approach in research and interventions to address fussy eating. Read the article.
Creator: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
Duration: 4:12
Lead author, Julia Anixt, MD presents findings from a research study evaluating the types of challenging behaviors parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) prioritize for treatment during Developmental Behavioral Pediatric (DBP) clinic visits. This study explores how much shared decision making (SDM) occurs during “usual care” DBP clinic visits, how often parent priorities are addressed in the treatment plan, and how often parents feel uncertain about the decision of whether to use medication to treat their children’s challenging behaviors. Read the article.
Creator: Veni Kandasamy; Krysten Carrera (HRSA's Maternal and Child Health Bureau); Milton Thomas (HRSA's Office of the Administrator)
Duration: 2:34
This is a video abstract for the Parental Perception of Flourishing in School-Aged Children: 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health manuscript. We discuss what flourishing in children is and its importance. We also discuss our data source, HRSA's National Survey of Children's Health. Our study findings that approximately half of school-aged children were found to be flourishing and that differences by sociodemographic factors in the likelihood of flourishing were reduced with the inclusion of environmental factors are also described. We close with next steps and areas for further study in flourishing. Read the article.
Creator: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Duration: 4:18
Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) used parent-reported data from national studies in 2007 and 2011 to understand how having Tourette syndrome and other conditions affect how children do in school, like repeating a grade, school problems, or needing special services. Having other conditions along with Tourette Syndrome was related to having difficulty in school and needing educational services. This is important information for healthcare providers, teachers and parents. Being aware of the potential challenges related to both Tourette syndrome and other conditions can help them to best support the child’s education. For further information on CDC’s research in this area, visit: www.cdc.gov/tourette.Read the article.
Creator: Seattle Children’s Research Institute
Duration: 6:36
Lead author, Jennifer Gerdts, PhD, discusses the rationale for developing a streamlined and efficient interdisciplinary diagnostic evaluation for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at Seattle Children’s Autism Center (SCAC). Dr. Gerdts compares diagnostic outcomes, follow-up care rates, provider satisfaction, billed time, and reimbursement amounts in interdisciplinary teams to those of more traditional psychology-led and physician-led models. She also suggests benefits of this diagnostic approach for families of children with ASD. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Walter Zahorodny and Justin Smith
Duration: 8:21
This video is a brief summary of the article, "Preliminary Evaluation of a Brief Autism Screener for Young Children." It provides the reasons for undertaking development of a new parent report tool and describes the methodology and initial data assessing the usefulness of the PDQ-1, a brief Autism screener for toddler-age children. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Aleix Cabrera, Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) Video
Duration: 02:43
This study is the first to demonstrate associations between a longer time spent engaging in cognitively stimulating activities and lower scores of both ADHD symptoms and behavior problems, in ADHD-free children at baseline. We also found that sleeping longer was associated with a lower ADHD symptom score. In contrast, time spent watching TV and time spent engaging in physical activity at age 4 years were not associated with ADHD symptoms or behavior problems at age 7 years, nor was there any evidence of interactions between the several exposures considered. Click here to read the article.
Creator: University of Maryland
Duration: 3:17
During toddlerhood, children establish regular sleep patterns, with night awakenings followed by returning to sleep without parental intervention. However, some toddlers experience frequent night awakenings and may require parental intervention to return to sleep. Co-sleeping, meaning sharing the same bed or same room, occurs among many families with toddlers. We found that when parents perceive that their toddler has a sleep problem and they co-sleep, mothers lose almost one hour of sleep and report increased symptoms of stress, depression, and anxiety. Practitioners might consider alternatives to co-sleeping when discussing sleep arrangements with parents.Read the article
Creator: Megan Narad, Jessica King
Duration:
We report on the rate need for academic services and academic service utilization among a cohort of children who sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI) between the ages of 3 and 7 years old, as they transitioned to middle school, approximately 6.8 years after injury. Findings show the need for services among students with a history TBI remains high even years after injury. Rates of unmet need were high across all injury groups (46.2%-63.6%), underscoring the importance of continued monitoring of students with a history of TBI, especially children with less severe injuries who are at risk for being underserved. Read the article
Creator: C. Thomas Lewis, IUPUI School of Informatics and Computing
Duration: 5:13
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is commonly encountered in primary care practice. Group visits are an alternate way to provide chronic care management while attending to the needs of families. This study examines the acceptability of group visits for ADHD care from the perspectives of caregivers, children and providers and lessons learned in using the group visits across two studies. A brief description of our ADHD group visit model, TEACH-Tailoring Education for ADHD and Children’s Health, is reviewed. Findings suggest that stakeholders find group visits acceptable and increased in satisfaction in ADHD care. Click here to read the article.
Creator: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Duration: 5:51
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Clinical guidelines provide recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), with specific guidance on caring for children younger than 6 years. This exploratory study describes ADHD diagnosis and treatment patterns among young children in the U.S. using two nationally representative parent surveys. Click here to read the article.
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Duration: 6:06
Early intervention programs under Part C of the Individuals with Disability Education Act serve a developmentally heterogeneous population of children ages birth to 36 months,. Applying mixture modeling to developmental assessment data from 1513 children who participated in a large, urban early intervention program, we identified four subgroups of children with distinct developmental profiles. Children's developmental trajectories differed by subgroup; children in the subgroup displaying severe delays in communication, with less severe delays in other areas of functioning, had the highest likelihood of persistent delays. Our study describes the identified subgroups and suggests implications for clinical practice and service planning. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Mater Research
Duration: 4:47
The Queensland Flood Study (QF2011) took advantage of a severe flood in Queensland, Australia to investigate the effects of disaster-related prenatal maternal stress on temperament characteristics at 6-months-old. Results showed that mothers’ subjective stress reactions and cognitive appraisal of the disaster while pregnant were associated with easier aspects of temperament in their infants. However, with higher levels of hardship in pregnancy, boys (but not girls) were rated as more irritable. Higher levels of hardship in early pregnancy also predicted more arrhythmic behavior. Finally, mothers whose emotional response to the flood exceeded the hardship they endured reported more active-reactive infants. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Elise Fallucco, MD
Duration: 4:35
This video is a brief summary of the study, "The Brief Early Childhood Screening Assessment: Preliminary Validity in Pediatric Primary Care". It describes the importance of early identification of behavioral and emotional problems in young children, and highlights the development and validation of the Brief ECSA which is a screening instrument used to identify these problems. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Alison Ventura and Brandon Rubenstein
Duration: 3:13
Dr. Alison Ventura discusses her study of patterns of infant bottle-feeding during the first year of life and the association of these patterns with infant weight gain. This research used an innovative methodology – group based trajectory mixture modeling – to address the limitations of previous research aimed at understanding links between infant feeding and health outcomes. This data-driven approach allowed for a better visualization of the balance between breast- and bottle-feeding that occurs for different subsets of infants, as well as how this balance changes across infancy. It also provided novel insights into associations between infant bottle-feeding and weight gain patterns. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Dr. Marisa Toomey
Duration: 3:54
The peer interactions of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are of particular interest to many physicians and researchers who work with children who have ASD. The PROMIS Pediatric Parent-Proxy Peer Relationships Measure was validated in a general pediatric population, but it had not been previously studied in children with ASD. Clinicians from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Boston Children's Hospital, and The Children's Hospital at Montefiore collaborated to evaluate the existing PROMIS Peer Relationships Measure in a population of children with ASD. In this video, Dr. Marisa Toomey highlights the potential significance of the study. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Nanette Gartrell, MD and Dee Mosbacher MD PhD
Duration: 4:01
Using the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children’s Health dataset, we compared spouse/partner relationships and parent-child relationships (family relationships), parenting stress, and children’s general health, emotional difficulties, coping behavior, and learning behavior (child outcomes) in households of same-sex (female) versus different-sex continuously coupled parents with biological offspring. We assessed whether associations among family relationships, parenting stress, and child outcomes were different in the two household types. We found that children with female same-sex parents and different-sex parents demonstrated no differences in outcomes, despite female same-sex parents reporting more parenting stress. Click here to read the article.
Creator: Deborah Christensen, PhD
Duration: 5:58
Population-based autism spectrum disorder (ASD) surveillance among 4-year old children provides valuable information about the early identification of children with ASD and suggests progression toward lowering the age of first ASD evaluation within participating Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring communities. Click here to read the article.