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Video Abstract: Associations Between Participation in After-School Activities, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Severity and School Functioning

Video Author: Yonit Lax
Published on: 12.23.2020
Associated with: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics. 42(4):257-263, May 2021

This video describes a cross-sectional study using data from the 2016 National Survey of Children’s Health on ADHD severity, after-school activities (ASA), and two domains of school functioning among children with ADHD: missed days from school and calls home from school. This study found that ASA participation is associated with decreased ADHD severity and reduced school absenteeism. Efforts to optimize ADHD outcomes should consider engaging children and adolescents in ASA.

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Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
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Play
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The “Completion of Social Determinants of Health Screenings in Pediatric Practices Participating in a Quality Improvement Initiative” video abstract discusses a study that aimed to evaluate the efficacy of implementation of the ASHEW initiative in pediatric practices location in Indianapolis. During this year-long study, rates of screening for social drivers of health and subsequent referrals to community resources were recorded. Needed referrals fulfilled significantly increased during the study, however, no significant improvement was seen in referring positive screens to resources. In conclusion, ASHEW provides a framework for successful development and efficient integration of screening and referral processes into clinic workflow.
Play
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Play
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Play
Creator: Tiffany Munzer
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This brief video highlights findings from “Child Media Use During Covid-19: Associations with Contextual and Social-emotional Factors.” We describe how psychosocial and contextual stressors were associated with children’s digital media use, and how digital media use was associated with social-emotional outcomes in adaptive and less adaptive ways.
Play
Creator: Luciane R. Piccolo
Duration: 4:58
This study examined: 1) impacts of a reading aloud intervention in northeastern Brazil, called Universidade do Bebê (UBB), on parenting and child development; 2) variation in impact by parent literacy level; and 3) indirect impacts on child outcomes through cognitive stimulation. Utilizing a randomized controlled trial, we demonstrated that UBB provided beginning in pregnancy and early infancy resulted in large enhancements in parenting outcomes, even for parents with low literacy, and indirect effects of UBB on child outcomes through cognitive stimulation in the home. Findings support implementation of reading aloud programs beginning in pregnancy and early childhood.
Play
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Duration: 2:24
The “Completion of Social Determinants of Health Screenings in Pediatric Practices Participating in a Quality Improvement Initiative” video abstract discusses a study that aimed to evaluate the efficacy of implementation of the ASHEW initiative in pediatric practices location in Indianapolis. During this year-long study, rates of screening for social drivers of health and subsequent referrals to community resources were recorded. Needed referrals fulfilled significantly increased during the study, however, no significant improvement was seen in referring positive screens to resources. In conclusion, ASHEW provides a framework for successful development and efficient integration of screening and referral processes into clinic workflow.
Play
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Duration: 7:02
Families of children with Neurodevelopmental disorders and complex health conditions experience persistent unmet needs and disproportionate deficits in service delivery. This video describes a clinical intervention study at Alberta Children’s Hospital aimed at improving health service access and addressing fragmented care across tertiary and community-based pediatric services. Families were paired with a complex care coordinator who acted as a hub, connecting the family, health, school and community services. Children enrolled in the program had fewer visits to the Emergency Department and less acute care use. Improvements in access to services, joint care planning, and linkages with school supports were demonstrated.
Play
Creator: Audrey Tluczek
Duration: 5:27
This abstract summarizes findings from the qualitative analysis of parent responses to a national survey conducted by the Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Foundation designed to increase our understanding of parents’ experiences in managing the needs of their children with CF and to identify potential gaps in services. Data sampled from 80 parents of children (< 18 years) showed that parents’ expertise expands with time and experience as they adapt to their children’s development and health. Parental expertise may not always be recognized or known to clinicians. The quality of clinical encounters, severity of CF, and parent hopefulness served as contextual factors.
Play
Creator: Dr. Kimberley J. Levitt, MD
Duration: 4:57
Cross-sectional survey study of 305 parents of elementary school-aged children living in Michigan during Winter 2021 that assessed the prevalence of child behavior, academic and sleep concerns, and parent depression and stress symptoms during COVID-19; tested associations of parent-child wellbeing with school format; and examined effect moderation by child race/ethnicity and material hardship. Compared to children receiving in-person instruction, children enrolled in remote learning experienced greater behavioral, learning-related, and sleep difficulties. Children with material hardships showed more behavior challenges overall, but less associated with school format. Parent depression symptom and stress scores were not significantly associated with child school format.
Play
Creator: Rosa Weng
Duration: 4:50
Our study reports long-term data of a 24-year-old male with SETD1B-related neurodevelopmental disorder and early-onset epilepsy (with absence and generalized tonic-clonic seizures). He displayed cognitive deficits, autistic features and profound language impairment. A de novo missense variant in SETD1B (c.5699A>G, p.(Tyr1900Cys)), encoding a lysine-specific methyltransferase, was detected by trio exome sequencing. Functional MRI examination revealed a diverging language task activation as well as an aberrant resting-state connectivity of the right precentral gyrus. Taken together, these findings suggest an altered neural basis for language functioning involving the motor system in our patient with SETD1B-related disorder.
Play
Creator: Katherine Traino, M.S.
Duration: 5:05
The impact of stigma due to their child’s disorder/difference of sex development (DSD) on parent psychosocial adjustment is poorly understood. In other pediatric populations, perceived interference of medical conditions into daily activities (i.e., intrusiveness) mediates the relationship of stigma to adjustment (i.e., depressive and anxious symptoms). The present study examined this mediation model in DSD. Parents who experience DSD-related stigma report greater interference of their child’s DSD into their daily activities, which is associated with poorer psychosocial adjustment. Findings support clinical interventions related to parents’ perceptions of stigma and intrusiveness to improve parent adjustment.
Play
Creator: Kelly Kamimura-Nishimura
Duration: 5:45
This study examines the simultaneous impact of patient, parent, and healthcare system factors on ADHD medication continuity. 84% of the children had at least 1 filled prescription, and a weaker perceived clinician-family working alliance predicted not filling any prescriptions. Factors linked to fewer days of medication coverage included non-White race, older age, being female, lower income, lower parent beliefs that ADHD affects their lives, and higher parent beliefs that medication is harmful, while child ODD and parental ADHD predicted better medication coverage. These findings may facilitate development of strategies to improve medication continuity for diverse children.
Play
Creator: Alithe van den Akker
Duration: 4:54
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Play
Creator: Juliana M. Holcomb, Anamika Dutta, Talia S. Benheim
Duration:
This study assessed the psychosocial vulnerabilities of adolescents with suicidal ideation (SI) using a large, national sample of adolescents (N=5,411) who were screened with both the Patient Health Questionnaire Modified for Teens (PHQ-9M) and the Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC-17P) at well-child visits. Nearly 5% of the sample reported past two-week SI. The presence and frequency of SI were associated with higher rates of internalizing, externalizing, and attention symptoms, as well as prior suicide attempts. Pediatricians can use the PHQ-9M and PSC-17P to screen for suicidal ideation and a broad range of psychosocial dysfunction and to target interventions accordingly.
Play
Creator: Matt Barnard
Duration: 5:23
Drs. Monika Neale, Chelsea Arnhart, and Sara Coffey discuss the importance of using Person-centered language (PCL) within autism research and discuss our research quantifying PCL adherence rates among published articles.
Play
Creator: Deanna Lau
Duration: 4:29
A diagnosis of ASD may be reliably made by 24 months old, yet the average age of ASD diagnosis is 4 years, 4 months old. Literature suggests that children with ASD have high rates of coexisting developmental behavioral disorders. Using nationally representative data from the 2011 Survey of Pathways to Diagnosis and Services, we investigated whether receiving a diagnosis of an alternate developmental behavioral disorder before ASD is associated with delays in ASD diagnosis following parental report of concern to healthcare professionals.
Play
Creator: Eric Fombonne
Duration: 9:26
This study, presented by Dr. Eric Fombonne, recruited 1,267 children (472 with autism, 410 with asthma, 385 controls) at several sites. Caregivers completed online standardized measures of psychiatric symptoms, of impairment in child’s functioning, and autism severity. At all ages and in both sexes, caregivers reported significantly much higher rates of psychiatric symptoms, and of impairment levels compared to both comparison groups. Among children with autism, psychiatric problems contributed to impaired functioning as much as autism symptomatology. The study suggests that systematic detection and management of emotional/behavioral problems in youth with autism could substantially improve their functioning and outcome.
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Creator: Suzanne Rybczynski, MD, MSHCM
Duration: 4:56
Suicide risk screening has been recommended for all ages in order to intervene and prevent suicide deaths through appropriate mental health services. Our study describes suicide risk screening in a neurodevelopmental disabilities and rehabilitation pediatric outpatient setting. It is feasible to implement universal suicide risk screening in youth with neurodevelopmental disabilities in outpatient clinic settings. We found our cohort to have a 6.8% rate of positive screenings similar to rates seen in neuro-typical children. As other healthcare institutions implement universal suicide risk screening, it is important that children with neurodevelopmental disabilities always be included in screening protocols.
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Creator: Radhika Raghunathan
Duration: 5:43
The COVID-19 pandemic has affected emotional and behavioral well-being of children and families. In this study, we investigated changes in children’s self-regulation before and during the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic and the impact of pandemic-related life disruptions on children’s behavior. Families who participated in an intergenerational study up to one year prior to the pandemic were recontacted (April 2020 - August 2020, n = 45, 87% Black). We found that children’s self-regulation decreased pre-pandemic to pandemic, particularly for children experiencing more pandemic-related disruptions. Children whose families have been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic may need focused support in school and at home to avoid widening pre-pandemic health disparities.
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Creator: Nancy Cheak-Zamora, Ph.D.
Duration: 3:44
The video details the study, Assessing and Promoting Independence in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder, including the qualitative methods used in the study, results, and implications.
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Creator: Addam J Wawrzonek
Duration: 5:35
The present study evaluated symptoms of pediatric feeding disorder in a sample of individuals with 3q29 Deletion Syndrome. Previous research has found that individuals with 3q29 deletion syndrome (3q29Del) may experience elevated feeding concerns in early childhood; however, the specificity of these feeding concerns is not well understood. Results suggest individuals with 3q29Del experience increased symptoms of pediatric feeding disorders that may require targeted evaluation and intervention for optimal outcomes.
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Creator: Marie-Josée Harbec, Gary Goldfield, Tracie A. Barnett, Linda Pagani
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This prospective-longitudinal study assesses the reciprocal relationship between physical activity, including sport participation, and depressive and anxiety symptoms, conceptualized as emotional distress, over time. We used a population-based longitudinal birth cohort design (n = 1438). We found that boys who were not physically active at age 5 years were more likely to experience later emotional distress from ages 6 to 10 years. Boys who experienced less depressive and anxious symptoms from ages 6 to 10 years were also more likely to be more physically active at age 12 years. We underscore male needs for physical activity for health promotion.
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Creator: Rashed AlRasheed
Duration: 5:20
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Creator: Ayten Bilgin
Duration: 5:52
This video describes our recent study published in the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics titled “Bed-Sharing in the First 6 Months: Associations with Infant-Mother Attachment, Infant Attention, Maternal Bonding and Sensitivity at 18 Months”. The current study investigated whether bed-sharing during the first 6 months of life is associated with infant’s attachment and attention and mother’s bonding and sensitive parenting at 18 months of age.
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Creator: Jordan Stefko, MD
Duration: 4:20
This study explored the relationship between the Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN) Screener and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). This study stratified the CSHCN population into children with: no special health care needs, health care needs with no functional limitations, and functional limitations. Children with functional limitations had higher mean total SDQ scores and higher SDQ factor scores. This emphasizes the important role of primary care clinicians in identifying children with chronic conditions who are at an increased risk of behavioral and developmental concerns. This can aid the clinician in identifying appropriate resources for children and families.
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Creator: Caroline M. Barry, MPH
Duration: 5:15
To evaluate the effect of a group-based parenting intervention (Legacy for Children™) on child health and development, researchers conducted a randomized control trial at two sites: Los Angeles and Miami. Results showed that the intervention had a positive impact on child behavioral and socioemotional development among families experiencing poverty.
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Creator: Kim Fatica, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Duration: 3:13
The subspecialty of Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics (DBP) is relatively young with the first board certification in 2002. The aim of our study was to define DBP by the clinical practice as reported by DBPs in AAP surveys of DBPs in 1998 and 2015. The amount of time for a new and a return visit remained stable. But, in 2015, fewer DBPs were caring for children with physical disabilities, failure to thrive, and other disorders. More than 80% of DBPs in both surveys evaluated children with ASD, ADHD, and developmental delays solidifying them as the defining focus of the field.
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Creator: Tuba Çelen Yoldaş
Duration: 4:01
The Parents’ Evaluation of Developmental Status (PEDS) and the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ) are commonly used developmental screening tools in pediatric practice worldwide. This study compared the screening results of the PEDS and the ASQ in children with a wide range of ages. The actual agreement between the tests was 74% with a concordance represented by Cohen’s κ of 0.422 in the total sample. The agreement was higher in children aged 25 to 48 months than for the other ages. The use of such parent-completed developmental tools should be encouraged for universal screening.
Play
Creator: Kate Wallis, MD, MPH
Duration: 4:43
We describe our study that investigated referrals made in response to a positive developmental screen in primary care pediatrics. We asked whether disparities exist in which referrals are made or if referral varied by sex or among children from different racial, ethnic, and income backgrounds. Using data on screening and referral from the large primary care network at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, which screens children at 15, 18, 24 and 30 month visits with the survey of wellbeing in young children (SWYC), we found that 43% of children were not referred to early intervention after a positive screen.
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Creator: Jennifer A. Mautone, PhD, ABPP
Duration: 4:04
This video provides an overview of our recent study focused on a strengths-based approach to behavioral health screening in pediatric primary care.
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Creator: Rachel Morgan and Linda Prudente
Duration: 4:30
School-age children with ADHD participated in an 8-week after-school Tai-Chi that showed robust reductions in core ADHD symptoms of hyperactivity, impulsivity, and inattention after the mindful movement training. Reductions were also seen in associated features including emotion dysregulation and symptoms of ODD. These children also showed robust improvements on an objective assessment of developmental motor control, and these objective improvements in motor control were significantly associated with improvements in subjective parent ratings of ADHD behavior. This suggests that motor control may be a biomarker that could be targeted by the mindful movement intervention to improve behavior in children with ADHD.
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Creator: Libby Matile Milkovich
Duration: 3:08
Phones interrupt in-person interactions. Problematic phone users likely have increased interruptions due to their addiction-like behaviors towards their phones. Child behavior can reflect the quality of in-person, caregiver-child interactions. To explore child behavior and caregiver problematic phone use, we surveyed caregivers of children about their problematic phone use and their perception of their child’s mealtime behavior. Higher ratings of child problematic mealtime behavior were associated with higher symptoms of caregiver problematic phone use. Although the study does not show causality, caregiver-child interactions are bidirectional thus possibly allowing for future child problematic behavioral interventions to address caregiver problematic phone use.
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Creator: Gerald Giesbrecht and Lianne Tomfohr-Madsen
Duration: 3:29
Video abstract for Parental use of “cry out” in a community sample during the first year of infant life, where we discuss associations between using delayed response to crying and associations with infant-maternal attachment and maternal sensitivity.
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Creator: Samantha Schilling, MD
Duration: 5:05
The efficacy of the group parenting program, Child Adult Relationship Enhancement in Primary-Care (PriCARE), in improving behavior in primary-care patients whose parents had identified a concern for behavior problems was previously demonstrated. In this second RCT, pre-existing behavioral problems were not required for participation, and the efficacy of a peer mentor on improving PriCARE attendance was also evaluated. Both positive parenting (measured by the Parenting Scale), and child behavior (measured by the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory-ECBI) improved in the treatment arms, even though the majority of children had subclinical ECBI scores at baseline. The peer mentor did not impact attendance.
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Creator: Yael Dvir, MD
Duration: 4:42
Our video abstract previews our paper on psychiatric symptoms, prevalence, co-occurrence and functioning among extremely low gestational age newborns at age ten years. We review the study’s objectives, with focus on importance, new information presented, as well as clinical applicability and clinical and research implications.
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Creator: Pinar Zengin Akkus
Duration: 4:06
Management of phenylketonuria (PKU) was reported to be time consuming and burdensome for caregivers. This study explored the experiences of families caring for a child with phenylketonuria/mild hyperphenylalaninemia in a country with a high PKU rate. Moreover, the factors associated with parental psychological well-being were highlighted. Read the article.
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Creator: Michelle Greene
Duration: 4:25
Mothers of very low birth weight infants (VLBW, birth weight less than 3 pounds, 5 ounces) experience maternal psychological distress, defined as depression, anxiety and perinatal post-traumatic stress (PPTS).This study estimated maternal distress at time of VLBW infants' birth, modeled change in distress over VLBW infants' first year of life, and examined predictors of distress. Distress declined over VLBW infants' first year of life. Mothers residing in lower income environments had lower PPTS and anxiety at VLBW infant birth. VLBW birth weight and maternal age, respectively, predicted change in anxiety over time, and change in depression over time. Read the article.
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Creator: Jessica VanOrmer, M.A.
Duration: 2:30
This study included 2,083 parents of children from the 2016 National Survey of Children’s health database. We examined the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and family resilience, including how these differed by diagnostic category (autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), comorbid ASD and ADHD, and neurotypically developing children). We found that ADHD children experienced significantly more ACEs and children with comorbid ASD and ADHD had the lowest levels of family resilience when controlling for demographic variables and ACEs. Further, as the number of ACEs increased, family resilience decreased. Results have implications for early intervention services. Read the article.
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Creator: M. Jackson Wilkinson and Carol L. Wilkinson
Duration: 3:45
Primary care providers and parents rely on developmental milestone checklists as tools for tracking a child’s development. However, there are multiple published milestone checklists that vary in their structure and content. Our team systematically evaluated the consistency and variability between four commonly used milestone checklists. We found that there was limited overlap in the content across these four checklists. In addition, the milestones shared across checklists were inconsistent in their estimated ages of when milestones should occur. Our findings highlight the need for objectively defined and accurately normed developmental milestones. Read the article.
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Creator: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Duration: 5:28
Researchers conducted a multi-site, randomized controlled trial to examine the impact of the Legacy for Children program on child health and development. Results revealed Legacy has a positive impact on child emotional and behavioral outcomes, child IQ, and mother-child interactions. Read the article.
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Creator: Andrej Kopac
Duration: 5:47
Increased television viewing is associated with language delays in early childhood Unlike traditional screen time, mobile media devices offer the opportunity to interact with the interface. Studies examining the relationship between mobile media device use and developmental outcomes including communication outcomes in young children are lacking. The objective of our study was to examine the association between mobile media device use and communication delays in 18-month-old children. Read the article.
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Creator: Philip Curtis
Duration: 3:33
The goal of this paper is to investigate the association between the two most commonly reported parental concerns about young children - disruptive behavior (e.g., irritable, aggressive, and noncompliant behaviors) and language delay in toddlers. Stronger language skills were associated with fewer disruptive behavior for children between 18 and 36 months of age. This negative association was stronger for girls than boys and stronger for children living in poverty than those above the poverty line. Findings from our study suggest a developmental co-occurrence pattern that begins at a very early age. Read the article.
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Creator: Chloe Beacham
Duration: 5:34
First-author Chloe Beacham discusses findings from the article “Screening for Autism Spectrum Disorder: Profiles of Children Who Are Missed”. Screening measures such as the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers, Revised (M-CHAT-R) and the Ages and Stages Questionnaire, 3rd Edition (ASQ-3) are parent-report questionnaires that target autism symptomatology and broad developmental delays respectively. This study sought to examine the profiles of children with autism spectrum disorder who are missed by these commonly used screening measures and also to build upon the current literature on the benefits of a combined screening approach. Read the article.
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Creator: Helen Koechlin, Carolina Donado, Joe Kossowsky
Duration: 5:16
In our article, we examined data collected by the National Institute of Child Health and Development for the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. This longitudinal cohort followed more than 1,000 children and their families from the child’s birth until the age of 15. Our findings highlight the importance of the context within which a child grows up: not only the family context and the mental health of parents, but also the peer context and friendships are important influences that help decide whether a child develops adjustment problems or not in the face of stressful life events. Read the article.
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Creator: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
Duration: 4:12
Lead author, Julia Anixt, MD presents findings from a research study evaluating the types of challenging behaviors parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) prioritize for treatment during Developmental Behavioral Pediatric (DBP) clinic visits. This study explores how much shared decision making (SDM) occurs during “usual care” DBP clinic visits, how often parent priorities are addressed in the treatment plan, and how often parents feel uncertain about the decision of whether to use medication to treat their children’s challenging behaviors. Read the article.
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Creator: Veni Kandasamy; Krysten Carrera (HRSA's Maternal and Child Health Bureau); Milton Thomas (HRSA's Office of the Administrator)
Duration: 2:34
This is a video abstract for the Parental Perception of Flourishing in School-Aged Children: 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health manuscript. We discuss what flourishing in children is and its importance. We also discuss our data source, HRSA's National Survey of Children's Health. Our study findings that approximately half of school-aged children were found to be flourishing and that differences by sociodemographic factors in the likelihood of flourishing were reduced with the inclusion of environmental factors are also described. We close with next steps and areas for further study in flourishing. Read the article.
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Creator: Seattle Children’s Research Institute
Duration: 6:36
Lead author, Jennifer Gerdts, PhD, discusses the rationale for developing a streamlined and efficient interdisciplinary diagnostic evaluation for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at Seattle Children’s Autism Center (SCAC). Dr. Gerdts compares diagnostic outcomes, follow-up care rates, provider satisfaction, billed time, and reimbursement amounts in interdisciplinary teams to those of more traditional psychology-led and physician-led models. She also suggests benefits of this diagnostic approach for families of children with ASD. Click here to read the article.
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Creator: Aleix Cabrera, Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) Video
Duration: 02:43
This study is the first to demonstrate associations between a longer time spent engaging in cognitively stimulating activities and lower scores of both ADHD symptoms and behavior problems, in ADHD-free children at baseline. We also found that sleeping longer was associated with a lower ADHD symptom score. In contrast, time spent watching TV and time spent engaging in physical activity at age 4 years were not associated with ADHD symptoms or behavior problems at age 7 years, nor was there any evidence of interactions between the several exposures considered. Click here to read the article.
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Creator: Wilko Duprez
Duration: 4:51
This longitudinal study assessed the intellectual, academic and executive functioning skills of children diagnosed with ADHD at diagnosis and four years later. Intellectual function was stable over the four-year interval. Reliable change analyses highlighted variability in academic performance, with half the children showing performance declines in at least one academic subject. Executive functions followed a generally stable or improving course. There was some evidence of better neurocognitive performance in those with partial symptom remission at follow up, however early cognitive functioning did not predict symptom outcome over time. Findings emphasize the importance of monitoring academic performance in children with ADHD. Click here to read the article.
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Creator: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Duration: 5:51
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Clinical guidelines provide recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), with specific guidance on caring for children younger than 6 years. This exploratory study describes ADHD diagnosis and treatment patterns among young children in the U.S. using two nationally representative parent surveys. Click here to read the article.
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Creator: Corinna Jenkins Tucker, Ph.D., C.F.L.E.
Duration: 5:25
This video is a brief summary of the paper, “Victimization by Siblings in Children with Disability or Weight Problems”. Using a national probability sample and controlling for other forms of maltreatment and individual and family characteristics, analyses showed that children with a physical disability and parent-perceived children who are thinner than average and children who are overweight experienced more sibling victimization. Children with an internalizing disorder experienced less sibling victimization. This the first study to highlight the importance of screening for sibling victimization in families of children with a disability and/or non-normative weight status. Click here to read the article.
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Creator: Clinton Vadnais, Media Specialist, Baystate Medical Center
Duration: 4:38
We describe a qualitative study of breastfeeding women designed to better understand the decision-making process women undergo regarding infant feeding over time. We conducted interviews at 2 weeks and follow-up interviews at 6 months postpartum. We used the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) as a framework for understanding the decision-making process. We found that themes related to perceived insufficient milk supply were strongly related to the perceived behavioral control component of the TPB and that these themes evolved over time. We discuss the clinical implications of these findings with respect to promotion of exclusive breastfeeding and maternal perceptions of control. Click here to read the article.
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Creator: Alison Ventura and Brandon Rubenstein
Duration: 3:13
Dr. Alison Ventura discusses her study of patterns of infant bottle-feeding during the first year of life and the association of these patterns with infant weight gain. This research used an innovative methodology – group based trajectory mixture modeling – to address the limitations of previous research aimed at understanding links between infant feeding and health outcomes. This data-driven approach allowed for a better visualization of the balance between breast- and bottle-feeding that occurs for different subsets of infants, as well as how this balance changes across infancy. It also provided novel insights into associations between infant bottle-feeding and weight gain patterns. Click here to read the article.
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Creator: University of Michigan Health System
Duration: 5:08
Dr. Jenny Radesky discusses her qualitative interviews with parents of young children about their mobile device use habits, highlighting the 3 main tensions parents expressed. These included: 1) cognitive tensions, feeling “information overload” and difficulties multitasking between tech and children; 2) emotional tensions, including the feeling that the sometimes “intrusive” nature of mobile media makes it more stress-inducing, but also that they seek it as a way self-regulate when stressed with parenting; 3) dyadic tensions, described as discomfort with how mobile device use during family routines seemed to interrupt moments of connection, but also could act as a peacekeeper.Click here to read the article.
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Creator: Nanette Gartrell, MD and Dee Mosbacher MD PhD
Duration: 4:01
Using the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children’s Health dataset, we compared spouse/partner relationships and parent-child relationships (family relationships), parenting stress, and children’s general health, emotional difficulties, coping behavior, and learning behavior (child outcomes) in households of same-sex (female) versus different-sex continuously coupled parents with biological offspring. We assessed whether associations among family relationships, parenting stress, and child outcomes were different in the two household types. We found that children with female same-sex parents and different-sex parents demonstrated no differences in outcomes, despite female same-sex parents reporting more parenting stress. Click here to read the article.
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