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Perceived Mentoring Practices in Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics Fellowship Programs

Diekroger, Elizabeth A. MD*; Reyes, Charina MD*,†; Myers, Katherine M. DO, MPH*; Li, Hong MS; Kralovic, Shanna K. DO*; Roizen, Nancy MD*

Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics: May 2017 - Volume 38 - Issue 4 - p 269–275
doi: 10.1097/DBP.0000000000000438
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Objective: Junior physicians describe mentoring relationships as integral to their career development and success. Current evidence suggests that mentoring is under-utilized despite interest from trainees. The purpose of this study is to describe the mentoring practices in developmental-behavioral pediatric (DBP) fellowship programs and identify mentoring needs of DBP fellows and recent graduates.

Methods: DBP fellows and recent graduates less than 5 years out of training from US-based DBP fellowship programs were contacted to complete a survey on their mentoring experiences in fellowship and early career.

Results: A total of 90 respondents completed the entire survey including 47 current DBP fellows and 43 recent graduates. Only 52% of respondents reported having a formal faculty mentor during their fellowship. Only 45% of recent graduates reported that they currently have a mentor, of those without a current mentor 83% said they would like to have a mentor. Adequate mentoring during fellowship was lowest for career development and research (34% and 27%). Satisfaction with mentoring was associated with having a formal mentor (p < .001) and receiving mentoring in multiple areas (p < .001). Qualitative responses suggested that effective mentoring addresses the mentee's career goals, provides insight into being a developmental-behavioral pediatrician, assists in navigating academics, and involves a personal relationship.

Conclusion: Results suggest opportunities for improved mentoring in DBP fellowship programs, particularly in the areas of career development and research and that there is a significant need for mentorship among recent graduates. Findings from this study can inform program improvement in mentoring for DBP fellows and recent graduates.

This article has supplementary material on the web site: www.jdbp.org.

*Department of Pediatrics, Division of Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics and Psychology, UH Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital and Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;

Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD;

Department of Pediatrics, UH Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Cleveland, OH.

Address for reprints: Elizabeth A. Diekroger, MD, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics and Psychology, UH Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital and Case Western Reserve University, 10524 Euclid Avenue Suite 3150, Cleveland, OH 44106; e-mail: Elizabeth.diekroger@uhhospitals.org.

Supported by the Rainbow Fellowship Research Award Program (FRAP).

Disclosure: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.jdbp.org).

Received October , 2016

Accepted February , 2017

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