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Interactive Music as a Treatment for Pain and Stress in Children During Venipuncture: A Randomized Prospective Study

Caprilli, Simona PhD*; Anastasi, Francesca PhD*; Grotto, Rosa Pia Lauro PhD; Abeti, Mariana Scollo PhD*; Messeri, Andrea MD*

Errata

This article had the incorrect spelling of the third author’s name. The correct spelling is Rosapia Lauro-Grotto.

Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics. 38(2):128, February/March 2017.

Interactive Music as a Treatment for Pain and Stress in Children During Venipuncture: A Randomized Prospective Study: Erratum

In the article that appeared on page 399 of the October 2007 issue, an author’s name was listed incorrectly on the Table of Contents. The author’s name should have appeared as Scollo Abeti, Marianna, PhD. This error has been noted on the online version of the article, which is available at www.jdbp.org .

Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics. 30(3):254, June 2009.

Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics: October 2007 - Volume 28 - Issue 5 - p 399-403
doi: 10.1097/DBP.0b013e31811ff8a7
Original Article
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Errata

Objective: The experience of venipuncture is seen by children as one of the most fearful experiences during hospitalization. Children experience anxiety both before and during the procedure. Therefore, any intervention aiming to prevent or reduce distress should focus on the entire experience of the procedure, including waiting, actual preparation, and conclusion. This study was designed to determine whether the presence of musicians, who had attended specific training to work in medical settings, could reduce distress and pain in children undergoing blood tests.

Methods: Our sample population was composed of 108 unpremedicated children (4–13 years of age) undergoing blood tests. They were randomly assigned to a music group (n = 54), in which the child underwent the procedure while interacting with the musicians in the presence of a parent or to a control group (n = 54), in which only the parent provided support to the child during the procedure. The distress experienced by the child before, during and after the blood test was assessed with the Amended Form of the Observation Scale of Behavioral Distress, and pain experience with FACES scale (Wong Baker Scale) only after the venipuncture.

Results: Our results show that distress and pain intensity was significantly lower (p < .001; p < .05) in the music group compared with the control group before, during, and after blood sampling.

Conclusions: This controlled study demonstrates that songs and music, performed by “professional” musicians, have a beneficial effect in reducing distress before, during, and after blood tests. This study shows, moreover, that the presence of musicians has a minor, but yet significant, effect on pain due to needle insertion.

From the *Pain Service and Palliative Care, Department of Oncoemathology, A. Meyer Children’s Hospital, Florence, Italy; and †Department of Psychology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.

Received December 2006; accepted May 2007.

Address for reprints: Simona Caprilli, PhD, Pain Service, AOU Meyer, Via L. Giordano 13, 50132 Florence, Italy; e-mail: s.caprilli@meyer.it.

Interactive Music as a Treatment for Pain and Stress in Children During Venipuncture: A Randomized Prospective Study: Erratum

In the article that appeared on page 399 of the October 2007 issue, an author's name was listed incorrectly on the Table of Contents. The author's name should have appeared as Scollo Abeti, Marianna PhD.

Reference:

Caprilli S, Anastasi F, Grotto RPL, et al. Interactive Music as a Treatment for Pain and Stress in Children During Venipuncture: A Randomized Prospective Study. J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2007;28(5):399-403.

© 2007 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins