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Developmental Coordination Disorder in Extremely Low Birth Weight Children at Nine Years

HOLSTI, LIISA M.A., O.T.; GRUNAU, RUTH V.E. Ph.D., R. Psych.; WHITFIELD, MICHAEL F. M.D., F.R.C.P.C., F.R.C.P.E.

Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics: February 2002 - Volume 23 - Issue 1 - p 9-15
Original Articles

ABSTRACT. Developmental coordination disorder (DCD) is defined as an impairment in the development of motor coordination that interferes with academic achievement or activities of daily living (DSM-IV). DCD has been reported to affect 5% to 9% of children in the normal population. This study describes the prevalence of DCD in a cohort of extremely low birth weight children (ELBW, ≤800 g) at 8.9 years of age, from which were excluded children with major impairments. Seventy-three children were included in the study group, along with 18 term-born, socially matched controls. Of the 73 ELBW children, 37 (51%) were classified as having DCD. ELBW children with DCD also had significantly lower Performance IQ (PIQ) scores and were more likely (43%) to have a learning difficulty in arithmetic than ELBW children who did not have DCD. This study found that DCD is a common problem in school-aged ELBW children.

Occupational Therapy Department and Neonatal Follow-Up Programme, British Columbia’s Children’s Hospital, Vancouver

Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Center for Community Child Health Research, Vancouver

Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Neonatal Follow-Up Programme, British Columbia’s Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Address for reprints: Liisa Holsti, M.A., O.T., Neonatal Follow-Up Programme, British Columbia’s Children’s Hospital, Room D610, 4480 Oak Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6H 3V4; e-mail: lholsti@cw.bc.ca; fax: 604-875-2483.

© 2002 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.