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Nocturnal Enuresis in Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease

BARAKAT, LAMIA P. Ph.D.; SMITH-WHITLEY, KIM M.D.; SCHULMAN, SETH M.D.; ROSENBERG, DANIEL B.S.; PURI, RUPA B.S.; OHENE-FREMPONG, KWAKU M.D.

Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics: October 2001 - Volume 22 - Issue 5 - p 300-305
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To assess the prevalence of nocturnal enuresis in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD) and associated factors, structured telephone interviews were conducted with primary caregivers of 217 children and adolescents with SCD aged 5 years or older. Prevalence, perceived causes, interventions undertaken, and emotional impact were assessed. Nocturnal enuresis was significantly higher for males (28.2% of males) than for females (11% of females), p = .002, and compared with cited population prevalence rates, nocturnal enuresis was significantly higher for children with SCD, p < .01. SCD was the most common reason given by primary caregivers for enuresis. Primary caregivers used a wide range of interventions for nocturnal enuresis, but few used empirically supported treatments for enuresis or spoke with their health care team about the enuresis. These data suggest that systematic assessment and intervention for nocturnal enuresis must be implemented in the follow-up care of children and adolescents with SCD.

Department of Psychology, Drexel University, Philadelphia (BARAKAT)

Department of Pediatrics, the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia (SMITH-WHITLEY, SCHULMAN)

Department of Psychology, Drexel University, Philadelphia (ROSENBERG, PURI)

Department of Pediatrics, the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (OHENE-FREMPONG)

Address for reprints: Lamia P. Barakat, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104; e-mail: Lamia.P.Barakat@drexel.edu.

Portions of this paper were presented at the 7th Florida Child Health Psychology Conference, Gainesville, FL, April 1999, and at the 24th Meeting of the National Sickle Cell Program, Philadelphia, PA, April 2000.

Acknowledgments. We wish to thank John Lam for assistance in data collection and Heather Lester for assistance in data collection and preliminary data analyses.

© 2001 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.