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The Comparative Effect of Cosmetic and Mechanical Prosthesis on Quality of Life and Performance in People With Medium-Length Below-Elbow Amputation

Moradi-Hades, Atiye, MSc; Farmani, Farzad, PhD; Mardani, Mohammad Ali, PhD; Bahramizadeh, Mahmood, PhD; Heidarimoghadam, Rashid, PhD

JPO: Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics: April 2019 - Volume 31 - Issue 2 - p 89–94
doi: 10.1097/JPO.0000000000000250
ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLES
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Introduction Upper-limb prostheses are divided into three groups: cosmetic (passive), mechanical, and powered. Each of these groups has specific characteristics and would be prescribed for special purposes. Some studies have separately examined function and quality of mechanical and cosmetic prostheses. Using the Trinity Amputation and Prosthesis Experience Scales (TAPES), the present research was aimed to compare and evaluate the quality of life and function of individuals with medium-length below-elbow amputation using mechanical and cosmetic prostheses.

Materials and Methods Fifty-two individuals with medium-length below-elbow amputation voluntarily participated in this study. The TAPES questionnaire was used in this study.

Results Regarding the general adjustment subscale, social adjustment subscale, functional activity subscale, social activity, appearance, satisfaction of weight, and functional satisfaction, significant differences were seen between two groups (P < 0.05). No significant difference was experienced between the groups in adjustment with restrictions subscale, sociopsychological adjustment, professional activity subscale, activity scale, and prosthesis satisfaction.

Conclusions It was found out that each of these two types of prosthesis is suitable for special activities and tasks, and each has a specific function that potentially could improve an individual's quality of life. Because both cosmetic and mechanical prostheses have their own strengths and weaknesses, they can both together be used by one individual with amputation, complement each other, and fulfill the needs of the person with amputation.

ATIYE MORADI-HADES, MSc, MOHAMMAD ALI MARDANI, PhD, and MAHMOOD BAHRAMIZADEH, PhD, are affiliated with the Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

FARZAD FARMANI, PhD, is affiliated with the Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.

RASHID HEIDARIMOGHADAM, PhD, is affiliated with the Department of Ergonomics, School of Health, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.

Disclosure: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Correspondence to: Farzad Farmani, PhD, Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Shahid Fahmideh St, Hamadan, Iran 6517838736; email: Farmani.farzad@yahoo.com

© 2019 by the American Academy of Orthotists and Prosthetists.