Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

The Affordable Care Act and State Coverage of Clinical Preventive Health Services for Working-Age Adults

Pomeranz, Jennifer L. JD, MPH; Yang, Y. Tony ScD, LLM, MPH

Journal of Public Health Management and Practice: January/February 2015 - Volume 21 - Issue 1 - p 87–95
doi: 10.1097/PHH.0000000000000102
Original Articles
Buy

Significant public health challenges facing the United States stem from preventable disease. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act dedicated substantial resources toward prevention. Among other reforms, the Affordable Care Act requires Medicaid and private health insurers to cover clinical preventive services for adults, pursuant to recommendations by the U.S. Preventive Service Task Force. This article examines the infrastructure upon which these recommendations are based, the requirements related to risk factors for leading causes of preventable disease in adults associated with tobacco and alcohol use, unhealthy diet, and inactivity, and coverage requirements for private plans and Medicaid. The article provides and assesses data comparing the health statuses of populations in and preventive services offered by states taking the Affordable Care Act Medicaid expansion versus those in states declining to expand coverage. The article suggests legislative and other methods to increase preventive clinical service requirements and notes outstanding issues for future research.

The article provides and assesses data comparing the health statuses of populations in and preventive services offered by states taking the Affordable Care Act Medicaid expansion versus those in states declining to expand coverage and suggests legislative and other methods to increase preventive clinical service requirements and notes outstanding issues for future research.

Department of Public Health, Center for Obesity Research and Education, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Ms. Pomeranz); and Department of Health Administration and Policy, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia (Dr Yang).

Correspondence: Jennifer L. Pomeranz, JD, MPH, Department of Public Health, Center for Obesity Research and Education, Temple University, 3223 North Broad St, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (Jennifer.pomeranz@temple.edu).

Funding for J.L.P. was provided by the Vitality Institute as part of its broader support for a Commission on the prevention of chronic diseases among working-age Americans.

The authors thank Jeffrey Levi, executive director of the Trust for America's Health, for comments on previous drafts, and Elizabeth Garbarczyk, Health Insurance Specialist at the Department of Health & Human Services, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, for research assistance.

No human participants were used.

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.