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Healthy People for the 21st Century

Understanding Use of Healthy People 2020 as a Web-Based Initiative

Heffernan, Megan, MPH; Fromknecht, Catharine Q., BS; McGowan, Angela K., JD, MPH; Blakey, Carter, BA; Oppenheimer, Caitlin Carroll, MPH

Journal of Public Health Management and Practice: March/April 2019 - Volume 25 - Issue 2 - p 121–127
doi: 10.1097/PHH.0000000000000784
Research Reports: Research Full Report

Objective: This study assesses how the nation's preeminent health promotion and disease prevention initiative, Healthy People, is utilized by key stakeholders.

Methods: A Web-based survey was administered to assess awareness and use of Healthy People among state, local, tribal health organizations and other key stakeholder groups. Follow-up interviews were conducted with a subset of respondents.

Results: Awareness and use of Healthy People have remained high among state, local, and tribal stakeholders. Healthy People 2020 is most frequently used as a data source. The Leading Health Indicators (LHIs) are an important element of the initiative, and nearly 90% of organizations that use the LHIs found them valuable. Awareness and use of other tools and resources are more limited.

Conclusions: Healthy People continues to be a valued resource among public health stakeholders; however, continued outreach is needed to promote the use of tools and resources available on healthypeople.gov for this decade and beyond. Healthy People is a national initiative used most frequently as a data source by state and local health departments, tribal organizations, and other public health practitioners.

NORC at the University of Chicago, Public Health Research Department, Bethesda, Maryland (Mss Heffernan, Fromknecht and Oppenheimer), and Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland (Mss McGowan and Blakey).

Correspondence: Megan Heffernan, MPH, NORC at the University of Chicago, 4350 East West Hwy, Suite 800, Bethesda, MD 20814 (heffernan-megan@norc.org).

This research was conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago with funding and support from the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, US Department of Health and Human Services.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citation appears in the printed text and is provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (http://www.JPHMP.com).

Copyright © 2019 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.