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Cancer Control Planners' Perceptions and Use of Evidence-Based Programs

Hannon, Peggy A. PhD, MPH; Fernandez, Maria E. PhD; Williams, Rebecca S. MHS, PhD; Mullen, Patricia Dolan DrPH; Escoffery, Cam PhD, MPH, CHES; Kreuter, Matthew W. PhD, MPH; Pfeiffer, Debra MA; Kegler, Michelle C. DrPH; Reese, LeRoy PhD; Mistry, Ritesh PhD; Bowen, Deborah J. PhD

Journal of Public Health Management and Practice: May-June 2010 - Volume 16 - Issue 3 - p E1–E8
doi: 10.1097/PHH.0b013e3181b3a3b1
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The Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network surveyed 282 cancer control planners to inform its efforts to increase the use of evidence-based cancer control programs (EBPs; programs that have been scientifically tested and have successfully changed behavior). Respondents included planners from organizations in state Comprehensive Cancer Control coalitions as well as other governmental and nongovernmental organizations and community-based coalitions. Respondents provided information about personal and organizational characteristics, their cancer control programs, their attitudes toward EBPs, and their awareness and use of Web-based resources for EBPs. Although findings showed strong preferences for cancer control programs that have been shown to work, less than half of respondents (48%) had ever used EBP resources. Regardless of whether they had used EBP resources, almost all respondents (97%) indicated that further training would help them and their organizations adopt and adapt EBPs for use in their communities. The most frequently endorsed training needs were finding and securing additional resources (such as funding and technical assistance), followed by adapting EBPs for cultural appropriateness. The Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network consortium is using these findings to develop a Web-based interactive training and decision support tool that is responsive to the needs identified by the survey respondents.

This study focuses on the training of cancer control planners to successfully adopt and implement evidence-based cancer control programs.

Peggy A. Hannon, PhD, MPH, is Assistant Professor, Department of Health Services, University of Washington, Seattle.

Maria E. Fernandez, PhD, is Associate Professor, Health Promotion and Behavioral Science, University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston.

Rebecca S. Williams, MHS, PhD, is Research Associate, Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Patricia Dolan Mullen, DrPH, is Professor, Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences, University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston.

Cam Escoffery, PhD, MPH, CHES, is Assistant Professor, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

Matthew W. Kreuter, PhD, MPH, is Professor, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri.

Debra Pfeiffer, MA, is Project Director, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri.

Michelle C. Kegler, DrPH, is Associate Professor, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

LeRoy Reese, PhD, is Research Associate Professor, Department of Community Health and Preventive Medicine, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.

Ritesh Mistry, PhD, is Assistant Research Scientist, Department of Health Services, University of California at Los Angeles.

Deborah J. Bowen, PhD, is Professor and Chair, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts.

Corresponding Author: Peggy A. Hannon, PhD, MPH, University of Washington, 1107 NE 45th St, Ste 200, Seattle, WA 98105 (peggyh@u.washington.edu).

Research for this publication was supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute cooperative agreements for the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network at Emory University, Rollins School of Public Health (1-U48-DP000043); Harvard University/Boston University Schools of Public Health (1-U48-DP000064); Morehouse School of Medicine, Morehouse Prevention Research Center (1-U48-DP000049); University of California at Los Angeles, School of Public Health (1-U48-DP000056); University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (1-U48-DP000059); University of Texas School of Public Health (1-U48-DP000057); University of Washington School of Public Health (3-U48-DP000050); and Washington University at St Louis (5-U48-DP000060).

The researchers thank Brandie Adams-Piphus, Michelle Carvalho, Lori Garibay, Joyce Guinyard, Nancy Healy, Alexis Moore, Candace Nelson, Irene Peña, Thuy Vu, and Lorraine Wallace for assisting with survey recruitment and data collection. Sandra Tyson assisted in pretesting and instrument development. The authors also thank Kurt Ribisl for review and comments of an earlier version of the manuscript.

© 2010 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.