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A Case Study of Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

Wedel, Lisa MS, APRN, CPNP-PC; Rash, Diane MSN, APRN, CPNP-PC, AC

Journal of Pediatric Surgical Nursing: July/September 2019 - Volume 8 - Issue 3 - p 74–78
doi: 10.1097/JPS.0000000000000215
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Toxic epidermal necrolysis is a rare, life-threatening, drug-induced disease that was first described by a Scottish dermatologist named Dr. Alan Lyell in 1958. After nearly 60 years, the mortality rate remains at approximately 30%. Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are differentiated by the percentage of skin involvement, with greater than 30% being classified as toxic epidermal necrolysis. Patients with Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis should be managed in a burn or intensive care unit. Prompt identification is crucial to the effective management and treatment of the disease. This article presents a case study of a 10-year-old boy diagnosed with toxic epidermal necrolysis with 94% skin involvement who was effectively treated and discharged without major complications or infections.

Lisa Wedel, MS, APRN, CPNP-PC Pediatric General Surgery Nurse Practitioner, Children's Mercy Hospital and Clinics, Kansas City, MO.

Diane Rash, MSN, APRN, CPNP-PC, AC Pediatric General Surgery Nurse Practitioner, Children's Mercy Hospital and Clinics, Kansas City, MO.

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Correspondence: Lisa Wedel, MS, APRN, CPNP-PC, Children's Mercy Hospital and Clinics, 2401 Gillham Rd., Kansas City, MO 64108. E-mail: lmwedel@cmh.edu

Online date: September 6, 2019

Copyright © 2019 American Pediatric Surgical Nursing Association
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