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Treatment Outcome Comparison Between Telepsychiatry and Face-to-face Buprenorphine Medication-assisted Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder: A 2-Year Retrospective Data Analysis

Zheng, Wanhong MD; Nickasch, Michael BS; Lander, Laura MSW; Wen, Sijin PhD; Xiao, Minchan PhD; Marshalek, Patrick MD; Dix, Ebony MD; Sullivan, Carl MD

doi: 10.1097/ADM.0000000000000287
Original Research

Objectives: To retrospectively review clinic records to assess the difference between face-to-face and telepsychiatry buprenorphine medication-assisted treatment (MAT) programs for the treatment of opioid use disorder on 3 outcomes: additional substance use, average time to achieve 30 and 90 consecutive days of abstinence, and treatment retention rates at 90 and 365 days.

Methods: Medical records of patients (N = 100) who were participating in telepsychiatry and in face-to-face group-based outpatient buprenorphine MAT programs were reviewed and assessed using descriptive statistical analysis.

Results: In comparison with the telepsychiatry MAT group, the face-to-face MAT group showed no significant difference in terms of additional substance use, time to 30 days (P = 0.09) and 90 days of abstinence (P = 0.22), or retention rates at 90 and 365 days (P = 0.99).

Conclusions: We did not find any significant statistical difference between telepsychiatry buprenorphine MAT intervention through videoconference and face-to-face MAT treatment in our Comprehensive Opioid Addiction Treatment model for individuals diagnosed with opioid use disorder in terms of additional substance use, average time to 30 and 90 days of abstinence, and treatment retention rates.

Department of Behavioral Medicine and Psychiatry (WZ, LL, PM, MN, ED, CS), School of Medicine; Department of Biostatistics (SW, MX), School of Public Health, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV.

Send correspondence and reprint requests to Wanhong Zheng, MD, 930 Chestnut Ridge Road, Department of Behavioral Medicine and Psychiatry, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26505. E-mail: wzheng@hsc.wvu.edu.

Received 10 August, 2016

Accepted 28 November, 2016

Funding disclosure: Data analysis was conducted by Dr Sijin Wen whose work was supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number U54GM104942. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

This project was funded by West Virginia University Department of Behavioral Medicine and Psychiatry internal research pilot grant.

The authors report no conflicts of interest.

© 2017 American Society of Addiction Medicine