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Motor Dysfunction as a Risk Factor for Conversion to Psychosis Independent of Medication Use in a Psychosis-Risk Cohort

Masucci, Michael, D., MA; Lister, Amanda, MA; Corcoran, Cheryl, M., MD; Brucato, Gary, PhD; Girgis, Ragy, R., MD

The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease: May 2018 - Volume 206 - Issue 5 - p 356–361
doi: 10.1097/NMD.0000000000000806
Original Articles

The Structured Interview for Psychosis-Risk Syndromes (SIPS) contains criteria for the Attenuated Positive Symptom Syndrome (APSS), a period of subthreshold positive symptoms that predates full-blown psychosis. Motor abnormalities are often associated with these symptoms but have not been adequately studied. We assessed a diverse sample of 192 APSS participants (27.1% female; 47.9% white; mean age = 20.03 years) for motor dysfunction (SIPS G.3. score) at baseline and conversion to psychosis every 3 months for up to 2 years. Fifty-nine (30.7%) participants converted to psychosis. Baseline G.3. score was significantly higher among converters than nonconverters (mean difference = 0.66; t[95.929] = 2.579, p < 0.05). No significant differences in baseline G.3. were found between demographic groups or those with differential medication use. These results point to the use of G.3. as a potential predictor of psychosis among APSS individuals and potentially implicate the shared biological underpinnings of motor dysfunction in the APSS and full-blown psychotic illnesses.

The Center of Prevention and Evaluation, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York.

Send reprint requests to Michael D. Masucci, MA, The Center of Prevention and Evaluation, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University Medical Center, 1051 Riverside Drive, Room 4800, New York, NY 10032. E-mail: masucci.mike@gmail.com.

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