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ANDREWS GAVIN M.D. F.R.A.N.Z.C.P. M.R.C. PSYCH.; TENNANT, CHRISTOPHER M.B. B.S., M.P.H., M.R.C. PSYCH.; HEWSON, DAPHNE M. PH.D.; VAILLANT, GEORGE E. M.D.
The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease: May 1978
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The effects of life event stress, coping style, and social support on psychological impairment were examined in a survey of a representative Australian suburban sample (N = 863). Psychological impairment was defined as a score of 4 or more on the 20-item General Health Questionnaire. Life event stress, coping style, and one of the social support variates, crisis support, were related to impairment, significantly decreasing or increasing the risk of being identified as impaired from the total sample frequency of 24 per cent. There was no evidence that coping style or social support became associated by moderating the relationship between life event stress and impairment, but rather because of their independent relationship with psychological impairment.

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