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Occupational Exposures and Hodgkin Lymphoma: Canadian Case–Control Study

Karunanayake, Chandima P. PhD; Singh, Gayatri V. PhD; Spinelli, John J. PhD; McLaughlin, John R. PhD; Dosman, James A. MD; McDuffie, Helen H. PhD; Pahwa, Punam PhD

Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine: December 2009 - Volume 51 - Issue 12 - p 1447-1454
doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e3181be6bfe
Original Articles
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Objective: The objective was to study the association between Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) and occupational exposures related to long-held occupation among males in Canada.

Methods: A population-based case–control study of HL was conducted among males stratified by province of residence and age group. Conditional logistic regression was used to fit statistical models.

Results: Several factors independently increased the risk of HL. Ever exposure to ionizing radiation from uranium showed a significant association with HL. Men who had smoked cigarettes for 25 years or more were the most likely to develop HL. Exposure to ultraviolet light and diagnosis with measles were negatively associated with HL, whereas diagnosis with shingles increased the risk of HL.

Conclusions: The higher risk of developing HL may be associated with exposure to uranium ionizing radiation and years of cigarette smoking.

From the Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture (Dr Karunanayake, Dr Singh, Dr Dosman, Dr Pahwa), College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; Cancer Control Research (Dr Spinelli), British Columbia Cancer Agency, British Columbia, Canada; Population Studies & Surveillance (Dr McLaughlin), Cancer Care, Ontario, Canada, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; and Department of Community Health and Epidemiology (Dr Pahwa), University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.

Dr McDuffie is deceased.

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

CPK made contributions to the statistical analysis and manuscript preparation. GVS made contribution to primary data analysis. JJS was the co-investigator and British Columbia representative who participated in the design of the study and who supervised data collection for the province of British Columbia. JRM was the co-investigator and Ontario representative who participated in the design of the study and who supervised data collection for the province of Ontario. JAD’s main contribution was grant writing and questionnaires development. HHM’s main contribution was grant writing, study design, questionnaires development, and study coordination. The concept of including family history variables in this study was HHM’s idea and she prepared the manuscript. JAD and HHM were co-principal investigators of the study. PP was the national coordinator and biostatistician for this study. PP was involved at the grant writing stage, participated in the design of the study, and questionnaires development. PP was the national coordinator and biostatistician for this study. PP trained data managers from the six provinces about data entry process, and supervised every stage of data cleaning. PP made significant contributions in the original statistical analysis required for the manuscript and preparation of the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Address correspondence to: Punam Pahwa, PhD, Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture, University of Saskatchewan, Royal University Hospital, 103 Hospital Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0W8, Canada; E-mail: pup165@mail.usask.ca.

©2009The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine