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Hexavalent Chromium Exposure and Nasal Tissue Effects at a Commercial Aircraft Refinishing Facility

Ceballos, Diana, PhD; West, Christine, PhD; Methner, Mark, PhD; Gong, Wei, MS

Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine: February 2019 - Volume 61 - Issue 2 - p e69–e73
doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001510
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan, School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations and Field Studies, National Institute for Occupational, Safety and Health, Centers for Disease, Control and Prevention, Cincinnati, Ohio

Division of Global HIV & TB, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations, and Field Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety, and Health, Centers for Disease, Control and Prevention, Cincinnati, Ohio

Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations, and Field Studies, National Institute for Occupational, Safety and Health, Centers for Disease, Control and Prevention, Cincinnati, Ohio

Occupational Disease Control, and Prevention Department, Jiangsu Provincial Center for, Disease Control and Prevention, Nanjing, China, Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations, and Field Studies National Institute for Occupational, Safety and Health, Centers for Disease, Control and Prevention, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Address correspondence to: Mark Methner, PhD, 1090 Tusculum Avenue Mailstop R-11, Cincinnati, OH 45226 (mmm5@cdc.gov).

Clinical Significance: As part of a comprehensive medical surveillance program, occupational health practitioners should routinely conduct nasal examinations for employees exposed to hexavalent chromium; they may present with nasal irritation, ulcerations, and bleeding even when low levels of urinary chromium biomarkers are measured.

Disclaimer: The findings and conclusion in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of NIOSH policy. Mention of trades names and or commercial products does not constitute endorsements or recommendations for use. The authors have no known conflicts of interest in conducting and reporting this research.

Funding: This work was supported by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diana Ceballos is a JPB Environmental Health Fellow. The JPB Foundation supports the JPB Environmental Health Fellowship Program, which is managed by the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. Diana Ceballos's time writing this manuscript was supported by grant NIH/NIEHS 2R25ES023635-04.

The authors have no conflict of interest.

Copyright © 2019 by the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine