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Examining the Likelihood of Experiencing Productivity Loss and Receiving Social Security Disability Income Following the Onset of Chronic Disease

Besen, Elyssa PhD; Jetha, Arif PhD; Gaines, Brittany MS

Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine: January 2018 - Volume 60 - Issue 1 - p 48–54
doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001159
Original Articles

Objective: The aim of the study was to examine the likelihood of reporting productivity loss and receiving social security disability (SSD) income following a chronic health condition diagnosis using a longitudinal panel design.

Methods: Using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, logistic regression analyses were conducted to estimate the likelihood of reporting productivity loss or receiving SSD following the diagnosis of arthritis, cancer, psychological problems, or heart conditions. Respondents reporting a new diagnosis of a condition were matched with five similarly aged respondents not reporting a diagnosis.

Results: For all conditions except cancer, the odds of reporting productivity loss and receiving SSD increased at both the wave where the condition was first reported and 2 years after for respondents reporting a condition compared with those not reporting a condition.

Conclusions: The onset of chronic disease increases the likelihood of experiencing productivity loss and receiving SSD.

Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, Center for Disability Research, Hopkinton, Massachusetts (Dr Besen); Institute for Work & Health, Toronto, Canada (Dr Jetha); Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada (Dr Jetha); and Department of Gerontology, University of Massachusetts, Boston, Massachusetts (Ms Gaines).

Address correspondence to: Elyssa Besen, PhD, Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, Center for Disability Research, 71 Frankland Road, Hopkinton, MA 0178 (etbesen@gmail.com).

This work was funded by the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety.

The authors report no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2018 by the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine