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Multiple Conditions Increase Preventable Crash Risks Among Truck Drivers in a Cohort Study

Thiese, Matthew S. PhD; Hanowski, Richard J. PhD; Kales, Stefanos N. MD; Porter, Richard J. PhD; Moffitt, Gary MD; Hu, Nan PhD; Hegmann, Kurt T. MD

Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine: February 2017 - Volume 59 - Issue 2 - p 205–211
doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000000937
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
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Objective: This study aims to quantify the crash risk for truck drivers with multiple comorbid medical conditions, after adjusting for confounders.

Methods: This retrospective cohort of 38,184 drivers evaluated concomitant medical conditions and subsequent crash data between January 1, 2005, and October 31, 2012. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for any cause and preventable crashes of varying severity.

Results: Drivers with three or more medical conditions had a significantly increased risk of preventable Department of Transportation (DOT) reportable crashes (HR = 2.53, 95% CI = 1.65 to 3.88) and preventable crashes with injuries (HR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.09 to 5.31) after adjustment for covariates. Similarly, adjusted HRs were 2.55 (95% CI = 1.37 to 4.73) for any cause DOT-reportable crashes and 3.21 (95% CI = 1.18 to 8.75) for any cause crashes with injuries.

Conclusions: Having three concomitant medical conditions may be a statistically significant risk factor for preventable and any cause DOT-reportable crashes and crashes with injuries.

Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational & Environment Health, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (Drs Thiese, Hegmann); Center for Truck and Bus Safety, Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, Blacksburg, Virginia (Dr Hanowski); Department of Environmental Health, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, Occupational Medicine, Cambridge Health Alliance/Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, Massachusetts (Dr Kales); Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (Dr Porter); Arkansas Occupational Health Clinic, Springdale, Arkansas (Dr Moffitt); and Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (Dr Hu).

Address correspondence to: Matthew S. Thiese, PhD, Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational & Environment Health, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Utah, 391 Chipeta Way, Suite C, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (matt.thiese@hsc.utah.edu).

This study has been funded, in part, by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH/CDC), grant 1K01OH009794 and NIOSH Education and Research Center training grant 3TC42OH008414. The CDC/NIOSH was not involved in the design and conduct of the study; collection management analysis and interpretation of the data; and preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript.

The authors disclose no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2017 by the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine