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Turning Intention Into Participation in Occupational Health Promotion Courses? The Moderating Role of Organizational, Intrapersonal, and Interpersonal Factors

Krick, Annika MSc; Felfe, Jörg PhD; Klug, Katharina PhD

Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine: October 2019 - Volume 61 - Issue 10 - p 779–799
doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001670
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
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Objective: Investigate organizational, intrapersonal (expectations, risk, strain, self-care), and interpersonal (health-oriented leadership) factors as predictors for employees’ participation in occupational health promotion (OHP) and the mediating effect of intention. Identifying moderators that strengthen the relationship between intention and participation.

Methods: Two cross-sectional studies using moderated mediation and moderator analyses analyzed data from N = 269 to N = 503 employees.

Results: Study 1 showed that favorable expectations and a supportive context predict participation via intention and strengthen the effect of intention on participation. The relationship between intention and participation was also stronger if leaders’ staff-care was higher. Study 2 showed that the relationship between intention and participation was stronger, if employees’ self-care was higher, and strain, neuroticism, and agreeableness was lower.

Conclusions: Findings provide suggestions how organizations may increase participation by supporting employees in building intention and turning their intention into participation.

Department of Work, Organizational, and Business Psychology, Helmut-Schmidt-University/University of the Federal Armed Forces, Hamburg, Germany.

Address correspondence to: Annika Krick, MSc, Department of Work, Organizational, and Business Psychology, Helmut-Schmidt-University/University of the Federal Armed Forces, Holstenhofweg 85, 22043 Hamburg, Germany (krick@hsu-hh.de).

Sources of funding: None.

Conflicts of Interest: None declared.

Clinical Significance: In light of low participation in occupational health promotion, it is important to examine, which factors increase intention and the likelihood of turning employees’ intention into participation. This study provides evidence for organizations to support employees to successful turn their intentions into participation. Leaders’ staff-care and a supportive context play a crucial role.

Copyright © 2019 by the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine