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Effect of Changing Work Stressors and Coping Resources on Psychological Distress

Lian, Yulong PhD; Gu, Yiyang BS; Han, Rui BS; Jiang, Yu PhD; Guan, Suzhen PhD; Xiao, Jing PhD; Liu, Jiwen PhD

Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine: July 2016 - Volume 58 - Issue 7 - p e256–e263
doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000000777
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
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Objectives: We examined whether or not changing work stressors and coping resources affect the risk of psychological distress.

Method: A baseline evaluation of work stressors and coping resources and mental health was assessed for 4362 petroleum industry workers after 12 years.

Results: Increased task and organizational stressors were associated with an elevated risk of psychological distress. Decreased task stressors, increased job control, and increased coping resources were associated with a reduced risk of psychological distress. Increased coping also had a buffering effect on increased work stressors and psychological distress. Gender-specific differences were observed in the factors influencing mental health.

Conclusions: The findings indicated that reducing gender-specific task and organizational stressors, and promoting coping resources at work may help prevent the onset of psychological distress.

Division of Occupational and Environmental Health, College of Public Health, Nantong University, Nantong city, Jiansu, China (Dr Lian, Gu, Dr Xiao), and Division of Occupational and Environmental Health, College of Public Health, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi city, Xinjiang, China (Dr Lian, Han, Drs Jiang, Guan, Liu).

Address correspondence to: Yulong Lian, PhD, Division of Occupational and Environmental Health, College of Public Health, Nantong University, 8 Seyuan Road, Nantong City, 226019, Jiansu, China (lianyulong444@163.com).

This work was supported by research projects funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant number 81260424, 81460489, and 81260425).

The authors report no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2016 by the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine