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Isocyanates and Human Health: Multistakeholder Information Needs and Research Priorities

Lockey, James E. MD, MS; Redlich, Carrie A. MD, MPH; Streicher, Robert PhD; Pfahles-Hutchens, Andrea MS; Hakkinen, Pertti (Bert) J. PhD; Ellison, Gary L. MPH; Harber, Philip MD, MPH; Utell, Mark MD; Holland, John MD, MPH, MS; Comai, Andrew MS; White, Marc PhD

Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine: January 2015 - Volume 57 - Issue 1 - p 44–51
doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000000278
Original Articles

Objectives: To outline the knowledge gaps and research priorities identified by a broad base of stakeholders involved in the planning and participation of an international conference and research agenda workshop on isocyanates and human health held in Potomac, Maryland, in April 2013.

Methods: A multimodal iterative approach was used for data collection including preconference surveys, review of a 2001 consensus conference on isocyanates, oral and poster presentations, focused break-out sessions, panel discussions, and postconference research agenda workshop.

Results: Participants included representatives of consumer and worker health, health professionals, regulatory agencies, academic and industry scientists, labor, and trade associations.

Conclusions: Recommendations were summarized regarding knowledge gaps and research priorities in the following areas: worker and consumer exposures; toxicology, animal models, and biomarkers; human cancer risk; environmental exposure and monitoring; and respiratory epidemiology and disease, and occupational health surveillance.

From the Department of Environmental Health (Dr Lockey), Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Pulmonary Division–-Department of Internal Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Ohio; Yale Occupational and Environmental Medicine (Dr Redlich), Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn; Division of Applied Research and Technology (Dr Streicher), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Cincinnati, Ohio; Risk Assessment Division (Ms Pfahles-Hutchens), Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention, US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC; Office of Clinical Toxicology (Dr Hakkinen), Specialized Information Services, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health; Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (Dr Ellison), Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Md; Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health (Dr Harber), University of Arizona, Tucson; Occupational and Environmental Medicine (Dr Utell), University of Rochester Medical Center, NY; Holland Associates (Dr Holland), Palo Alto, Calif; International Union (Mr Comai), UAW, Health and Safety, Detroit, Mich; and Department of Family Practice (Dr White), University of British Columbia, and Canadian Institute for the Relief of Pain and Disability, Vancouver, Canada.

Address correspondence to: James E. Lockey, MD, MS, Department of Environmental Health, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3223 Eden Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (lockeyje@ucmail.uc.edu).

Dr Redlich reports grants from NIOSH-CDC and NIOSH-CPWR, fees for lectures, fees by workers compensation carriers, insurance carriers, and legal fees; Dr Hakkinen reports grants from NIOSH, speaker and consulting fees, fees by grant review committees; consulting, workers compensation and legal consultation, expert testimony, and presentation (ACOEM) fees. Mr Comai reports grants from NIH/NIEHS; Dr White reports fees by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research–Institute of Cancer Research, Lear Corporation, Magna International Inc, VitaFoam Products Canada, Polyurethane Foam Association, and The Woodbridge Group.

Academic and government financial support: National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute; Canadian Institutes for Health Research–Institute of Cancer Research; and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

Industry financial support: The Woodbridge Group, Lear Corporation, Magna International Inc, VitaFoam Products Canada, and Polyurethane Foam Association. This conference was in part sponsored by the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

Comments expressed in this summary should not be construed to represent the views or policies of the authors' affiliated organizations or the professional organizations and agencies that participated as in-kind sponsors for the conference. The contributions to this summary reflect observations made, opinions expressed, and conclusions drawn during the conference and which have been summarized by the authors acting in their role as conference or section chairs or as members of the conference planning committee. Mention of trade names of commercial products should not be interpreted as an endorsement by authors, affiliated organizations, or the professional organizations and agencies that participated in the conference. For those authors employed by the US EPA, the views expressed in this article are solely those of the authors and do not represent the policies of the US EPA. Mention of trade names of commercial products should not be interpreted as an endorsement by the US EPA. For those authors employed by NIOSH, the findings and conclusions in this report are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the views of NIOSH.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine