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The Combination of Work Organizational Climate and Individual Work Commitment Predicts Return to Work in Women But Not in Men

Holmgren, Kristina PhD; Ekbladh, Elin PhD; Hensing, Gunnel PhD; Dellve, Lotta PhD

Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine: February 2013 - Volume 55 - Issue 2 - p 121–127
doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e3182820536
Original Articles
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CME

Objective: To analyze if the combination of organizational climate and work commitment can predict return to work (RTW).

Methods: This prospective Swedish study was based on 2285 participants, 19 to 64 years old, consecutively selected from the employed population, newly sick-listed for more than 14 days. Data were collected in 2008 through postal questionnaire and from register data.

Results: Among women, the combination of good organizational climate and fair work commitment predicted an early RTW with an adjusted relative risk of 2.05 (1.32 to 3.18). Among men, none of the adjusted variables or combinations of variables was found significantly to predict RTW.

Conclusions: This study demonstrated the importance of integrative effects of organizational climate and individual work commitment on RTW among women. These factors did not predict RTW in men. More research is needed to understand the RTW process among men.

From the Social Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine (Drs Holmgren and Hensing), The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Occupational Therapy, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation (Dr Holmgren), The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Faculty of Health Sciences, the University of Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden (Dr Ekbladh); and School of Technology and Health KTH—Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden (Dr Dellve).

Address Correspondence to: Kristina Holmgren, PhD, Social Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, PO Box 453, SE-405 Göteborg, Sweden (kristina.holmgren@neuro.gu.se).

This study was funded by research funding of the Swedish Social Insurance Agency. There were no competing interests. Consent was obtained from all the participants. Approval was taken from the regional Ethical Review Board at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

Authors Holmgren, Ekbladh, Hensing, and Dellve have no relationships/conditions/circumstances that present potential conflict of interest.

The JOEM Editorial Board and planners have no financial interest related to this research.

©2013The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine