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Shift Work and Sleep: Optimizing Health, Safety, and Performance

Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine: May 2011 - Volume 53 - Issue - p S1–S10
doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e31821aec20
CME ARTICLE

Shift work is a fundamental component of the US workforce and an integral part of the lifestyles of a large proportion of the population. More than 22 million Americans work on shifts as part of their work life. Emerging research suggests that shift workers are at higher risk for a range of metabolic disorders and diseases (eg, obesity, cardiovascular disease, peptic ulcers, gastrointestinal problems, abnormal blood glucose levels, and metabolic syndrome). Sleep disorders associated with shift work also pose a serious public health risk, as they can impair an individual's ability to perform effectively and may lead to occupational and traffic accidents.

This CME activity provides a summary of the curriculum developed at a scientific roundtable presented by the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine and the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research, a division of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute/National Institutes of Health. The roundtable, “Shift Work and Sleep: Optimizing Health, Safety, and Performance,” took place on September 27, 2010, in Crystal City, Virginia. Cooperating organizations for this initiative included the National Sleep Foundation, Sleep Research Society, American Academy of Sleep Medicine, American Association for Respiratory Care, American College of Osteopathic Family Physicians, American Lung Association, American Sleep Apnea Association, and National Organizations for Youth Safety.

Faculty: Natalie P. Hartenbaum, MD, MPH, FACOEM and Phyllis C. Zee, MD, PhD

Compiled by: Carole Drexel, PhD, Director of Accreditation and Outcomes Research, Rockpointe Corporation, and Anne Jacobson, MPH, CCMEP, Medical Writer, Rockpointe Corporation

Roundtable participants included Charles A. Czeisler, PhD, MD, FRCP (Chair for the roundtable)-–Baldino Professor of Sleep Medicine and Director, Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Senior Physician and Chief, Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Mass; Natalie P. Hartenbaum, MD, MPH, FACOEM (Chair for the roundtable)-–President and Chief Medical Officer, OccuMedix Inc, Dresher, Pa; Michael J. Twery, PhD (Chair for the roundtable)-–Director, National Center on Sleep Disorders Research, NHLBI, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md; Karl Doghramji, MD-–Medical Director, Jefferson Sleep Disorders Center; Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Medicine; Program Director, Fellowship in Sleep Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pa; Laura K. Barger, PhD-–Instructor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Associate Physiologist, Division of Sleep Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Ma; Eve Van Cauter, PhD-–Frederick H. Rawson, Professor, Department of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill; Thomas Roth, PhD—Chief, Division Head, Sleep Disorders and Research Center; Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI; and Phyllis C. Zee, MD, PhD-–Professor of Neurology, Neurobiology, and Physiology, Director, Sleep Disorders Program, Northwestern University, Chicago, Ill.

Target Audience: This program is intended for occupational health and environmental physicians, primary care physicians, and allied health professionals (eg, nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and pharmacists).

Accreditation: This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and Policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and Rockpointe Corporation. The University of Cincinnati College of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education to physicians.

Designation Statement: The University of Cincinnati College of Medicine designates this educational activity for a maximum of 2.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s). Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

For information about the accreditation of this program, please contact Kay Weigand at weiganka@ucmail.uc.edu.

All faculty members (or anyone else in a position to control content, such as activity planners) are required to complete a Disclosure of Commercial Interest and Resolution form and to cooperate with identified methods for resolving conflict of interest prior to participating in the activity. The University of Cincinnati requires disclosure to the learners of all relevant financial relationships and adheres strictly to the ACCME Standards for Commercial Support.

The faculty reported the following relevant financial relationships that they or their spouse/partner have with commercial interests: Natalie P. Hartenbaum, MD, MPH, FACOEM: Spouse works for Merck; Phyllis C. Zee, MD, PhD: Advisory Board: Takeda, Sanofi-Aventis, Merck, Zeo, Philips-Respironics; Stock Option: Zeo

Nonfaculty content contributors and/or reviewers reported the following relevant financial relationships that they or their spouse/partner have with commercial interests: Kay Weigand; Carole Drexel, PhD; Anne Jacobson, MPH, CCMEP; Bradley Pine; Blair St Amand; Jay Katz: Nothing to Disclose.

Instructions to Receive Credit: To successfully complete this activity for credit, participants must complete a CME program evaluation. Certificate of credit or participation will be sent in the mail within 4 weeks.

There is no fee associated with this educational activity.

Jointly sponsored by the University of Cincinnati and Rockpointe Corporation.

Supported by an educational grant from Cephalon.

Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine