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CSM 2011 Platform Presentations (abstracts are online*)

Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy: December 2010 - Volume 34 - Issue 4 - p 221–223
doi: 10.1097/NPT.0b013e3181fd5ed5
SECTION NEWS & NOTES: CSM 2011 Platform Presentations
Free

Parkinson Disease

Thursday, Feb 10, 12:30–3:00 pm

1. Physical Therapy Program, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO; 2. Biostatistics and Informatics, School of Public Health, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO.

1. Physical Therapy Program, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO; 2. Biostatistics and Informatics, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO; 3. Neurological Sciences, Rush University, Chicago, IL; 4. Geriatric Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO.

1. Physical Therapy & Athletic Training, Boston University; College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences, Boston, MA; 2. Physical Therapy, University of Colorado, Denver, CO; 3. Biostatistics and Informatics, University of Colorado, Denver, CO; 4. Section of Movement Disorders, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL; 5. Occupational Therapy, Tufts University, Medford, MA.

1. Boston University, Boston, MA; 2. University of New England, Biddeford, ME; 3. Washington University, St. Louis, MO; 4. University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL; 5. University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.

1. Program in Physical Therapy, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.

EFFECT OF MEDICATION ON ATTENTIONAL DEMANDS OF PRECISION AND POWER GRIPS IN INDIVIDUALS WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE (PD). S. D. Pradhan1, R. Scherer2, Y. Matsuoka2, V. E. Kelly1

1. Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2. Computer Science & Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

1. Program in Physical Therapy, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO.

1. Physical Therapy, Creighton University, Omaha, NE.

1. Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO; 2. Biostatistics and Informatics, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO; 3. Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO.

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS OF FALLERS AND NON-FALLERS WITH PARKINSON DISEASE. J. Cavanaugh2, G. M. Earhart4, T. Ellis3, M. Ford5, K. B. Foreman1, L. E. Dibble1

1. Physical Therapy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; 2. Physical Therapy, University of New England, Portland, ME; 3. Boston University, Boston, MA; 4. Physical Therapy, Washington University, St Louis, MO; 5. Physical Therapy, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL.

Stroke: Rehabilitation and Robotics

Friday, Feb 11, 1:00–4:45 PM

SENSORY RETRAINING IN CHRONIC STROKE: EVIDENCE OF CORTICAL AND BEHAVIORAL CHANGES. A. Borstad1, D. S. Nichols-Larsen1, P. Schmalbrock2

1. School of Allied Medical Professions, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; 2. Radiology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.

1. Department of Physical Therapy, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Coral Gables, FL; 2. The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, Miami, FL.

DETERMINING AN OPTIMAL DURATION OF LOCOMOTOR TRAINING TO MAXIMIZE FUNCTIONAL IMPROVEMENTS POST STROKE. K. A. Danks1, M. Roos2, D. Reisman1, S. Binder-Macleod1

1. Physical Therapy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE; 2. Biomechanics and Movement Science, University of Delaware, Newark, DE.

1. Physical Therapy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE; 2. Health, Nutrition, and Exercise Science, University of Delaware, Newark, DE.

1. Physical Therapy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE.

1. Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

1. Division of Physical Therapy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.

1. Allied Medicine – Physical Therapy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; 2. Center for Brain and Spinal Cord Repair, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; 3. Neuroscience Graduate Studies Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.

1. Physical Therapy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; 2. Neuroscience Graduate Studies Program, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.

1. Neuroscience Graduate Studies Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; 2. Division of Physical Therapy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; 3. Center for Brain and Spinal Cord Repair, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.

1. Interdisciplinary Program in Neuroscience, Georgetown University, Washington, DC; 2. Human Cortical Physiology Section, NINDS, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.

1. Rehabilitation and Movement Science, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ; 2. Biomedical Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ.

1. Krannert School of Physical Therapy, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN.

1. Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Northwestern University, Chicago.

1. Sensory and Motor Performance Program, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL; 2. Fundamental Technology Research Center, Honda R&D Co., Ltd., Tokyo, JAPAN; 3. Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; 4. Physical Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL.

Traumatic Brain Injury/Spinal Cord Injury

Saturday, Feb 12, 8:00–10:30 AM

POSTSURGICAL OUTCOMES IN SUPERIOR CANAL DEHISCENCE (SCD) SYNDROME: RECOVERY OF FUNCTIONAL VOR. K. Janky1, M. Zuniga1, J. Carey1, M. Schubert1

1. Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.

CHARACTERIZING HIGH VELOCITY ANGULAR VESTIBULO OCULAR REFLEX (AVOR) FUNCTION IN SERVICE MEMBERS POSTBLAST EXPOSURE. M. Scherer1, M. Schubert2

1. Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Baltimore, MD; 2. Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.

1. Shepherd Center, Atlanta, GA; 2. Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL; 3. Carolinas Rehabilitation, Charlotte, NC; 4. Craig Hospital, Englewood, CO; 5. Institute for Clinical Outcomes Research, Salt Lake City, UT; 6. Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY.

1. Carolinas Rehabilitation, Charlotte, NC; 2. Shepherd Center, Atlanta, GA.

DO PATIENT AND INJURY CHARACTERISTICS PREDICT TIME SPENT IN PHYSICAL THERAPY ACTIVITIES? FINDINGS FROM THE SCIREHAB STUDY. A. Natalie1, S. M. Taylor2

1. Allied Health, Craig Hospital, Englewood, CO; 2. Allied Health, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

1. Allied Health, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL; 2. Allied Health, Carolinas Rehabilitation, Charlotte, NC.

1. Physical Therapy, Ithaca College, Rochester, NY; 2. School of Nursing, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY; 3. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.

1. Rehabilitation R&D Center, VA Palo Alto Heath Care System, Palo Alto, CA; 2. Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

GROUP THERAPY UTILIZATION IN INPATIENT REHABILITATION FOR ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY. J. M. Zanca1, A. Natale2, J. Nicolosi2

1. Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY; 2. Craig Hospital, Englewood, CO.

1. Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; 2. Sensory Motor Performance Program, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL; 3. College of Education and College of Public Health, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE; 4. Physical Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; 5. Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

© 2010 Neurology Section, APTA