Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Piloting a Sex-Specific, Technology-Enhanced, Active Learning Intervention for Stroke Prevention in Women

Dirickson, Amanda; Stutzman, Sonja E.; Alberts, Mark J.; Novakovic, Roberta L.; Stowe, Ann M.; Beal, Claudia C.; Goldberg, Mark P.; Olson, DaiWai M.

Journal of Neuroscience Nursing: December 2017 - Volume 49 - Issue 6 - p 349–354
doi: 10.1097/JNN.0000000000000323
Article
Buy
SDC

ABSTRACT Background: Recent studies reveal deficiencies in stroke awareness and knowledge of risk factors among women. Existing stroke education interventions may not address common and sex-specific risk factors in the population with the highest stroke-related rate of mortality. Objective: This pilot study assessed the efficacy of a technology-enhanced, sex-specific educational program (“SISTERS”) for women’s knowledge of stroke. Methods: This was an experimental pretest-posttest design. The sample consisted of 150 women (mean age, 55 years) with at least 1 stroke risk factor. Participants were randomized to either the intervention (n = 75) or control (n = 75) group. Data were collected at baseline and at a 2-week posttest. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in mean knowledge score (P = .67), mean confidence score (P = .77), or mean accuracy score (P = .75) between the intervention and control groups at posttest. Regression analysis revealed that older age was associated with lower knowledge scores (P < .001) and lower confidence scores (P < .001). After controlling for age, the SISTERS program was associated with a statistically significant difference in knowledge (P < .001) and confidence (P < .001). Conclusions: Although no change occurred overall, after controlling for age, there was a statistically significant benefit. Older women may have less comfort with technology and require consideration for cognitive differences.

Amanda Dirickson, MSN APRN ANP, is Advanced Practice Supervisor, Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.

Sonja E. Stutzman, PhD, is Clinical Research Manager, Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.

Mark J. Alberts, MD, is Chief, Department of Neurology, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT.

Roberta L. Novakovic, MD, is Associate Professor, Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.

Ann M. Stowe, PhD, is Assistant Professor, Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.

Claudia C. Beal, PhD RN, is Associate Professor, Department of Nursing, Baylor University, Dallas, TX.

Mark P. Goldberg, MD, is Professor and Chairman, Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.

Questions or comments about this article may be directed to DaiWai M. Olson, PhD RN, at DaiWai.Olson@UTSouthwestern.edu. He is an Associate Professor, Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.

The St. Paul Medical Foundation in Dallas, Texas, provided research grant support.

Dr. Olson is the Editor of the Journal of Neuroscience Nursing. The remaining authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal’s Web site (www.jnnonline.com).

© 2017 American Association of Neuroscience Nurses