Secondary Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Share this article on:

The Future of Cognitive Remediation Training in Older Adults

Vance, David E.; Keltner, Norman L.; McGuinness, Teena; Umlauf, Mary Grace; Yuan, Yih-Ying

Journal of Neuroscience Nursing: October 2010 - Volume 42 - Issue 5 - p 255-264
doi: 10.1097/JNN.0b013e3181ecb003
Article

ABSTRACT With the growing population of older adults, nurses will need to address age-related cognitive declines. Evidence demonstrates that cognitive remediation training is effective in improving neuropsychological abilities in older adults, which can translate into improved functioning in instrumental activities of daily living. The future of cognitive remediation training will incorporate health promoting factors (e.g., sleep hygiene, physical exercise), which supports neuroplasticity and cognitive reserve. By approaching cognitive health holistically, the patient will be primed to receive the maximum benefit from cognitive remediation training. A model emphasizing this approach is provided as a didactic for nurses and other health professionals providing care to their older patients.

Norman L. Keltner, EdD RN, is a professor, School of Nursing, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Birmingham, AL.

Teena McGuinness, PhD PMH-NP BC, is a professor, School of Nursing, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Birmingham, AL.

Mary Grace Umlauf, PhD RN FAAN, is a professor, School of Nursing, Capstone College of Nursing, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL.

Yih-Ying Yuan, BS, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Birmingham, AL.

Question or comments about this article may be directed to David E. Vance, PhD MGS, at devance@uab.edu. He is an assistant professor at the School of Nursing, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Birmingham, AL.

© 2010 American Association of Neuroscience Nurses