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The 41st Annual Meeting of the North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society

Digre, Kathleen B. MD

Section Editor(s): Digre, Kathleen B. MD

Erratum

In the article that appeared on page e13 of the June 2015 issue of Journal of Neuro-Ophthalmology , a typographical error appeared within the fourth paragraph. The corrected paragraph is:

This year’s optional symposia also were popular. A number of our colleagues gave us a “tour” of International Neuro-Ophthalmology during a session chaired by Christian Lueck and Klara Landau. Mitch Strominger led a hands-on workshop on “Prism Therapeutics in Diplopia.” Betty Kovacs from the St. Luke’s Weight Loss Center in New York City and Shana McCormick from the University of Pennsylvania gave attendees practical ways to assist our obese patients (adult and pediatric) regarding weight loss. Janet Rucker and David Newman-Toker led the sold-out “Eye Movement and Vestibular Skills” session. In addition, we learned about many new neuro-ophthalmic research directions in both the scientific platform and poster sessions.

Journal of Neuro-Ophthalmology. 35(3):e28, September 2015.

Journal of Neuro-Ophthalmology: June 2015 - Volume 35 - Issue 2 - p e13–e14
doi: 10.1097/WNO.0000000000000257
Neuro-Ophthalmology News
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Erratum

Departments of Ophthalmology and Neurology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

The North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society held its 41st annual meeting at the Hotel del Coronado in San Diego, California, the site of the classic movie, “Some Like it Hot,” starring Marilyn Monroe, Jack Lemmon, and Tony Curtis. Although the weather was not hot, the symposia, lectures, and interactions were “hot and lively.”

Co-chairs of the Frank Walsh Society meeting were Benjamin Frishberg and Howard Krauss, who carried out the theme of the classic movie by introducing each abstract with a movie theme. Our outstanding guests this year included John Rhee, neuroradiologist, Yuki Takasumi, neuropathologist, Daniel Kelly, neurosurgeon (all from Providence Saint John's Health Center, Santa Monica, CA), and Chester Griffiths, otolaryngologist from UCLA (Fig. 1). The best Walsh paper was presented by Lulu Burnsztyn from the University of Michigan. The presentation was entitled “Joe and Jerry Flew the Coop” and dealt with the case of H1N1 virus causing bilateral retinal and lateral geniculate nucleus infarctions.

FIG. 1

FIG. 1

Several symposia featured new treatments and disease pathophysiology. “Journal Club” topics included new therapies for multiple sclerosis, the potential association between phosphodiesterase inhibitors and anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, the use of bariatric surgery in idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and the neuro-ophthalmologic consequences of obstructive sleep apnea. The “Hot Topics” this year featured nonmydriatic fundus photography, imaging of Horner syndrome, and neuro-ophthalmologic consequences of outer space travel. We also learned the outcomes of the recently released Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial, and we were treated to a symposium on “Mechanical Causes of Strabismus” with guest Joseph Demer from Jules Stein Eye Institute, UCLA. A unique symposium drew record crowds and standing room only when NANOS partnered with the American Glaucoma Society for a joint symposium on one of the most common optic neuropathies, glaucoma. The Jacobson Lecture was delivered by Thomas Slamovits, who discussed “Neuroendocrine Tumors in Neuro-Ophthalmology.”

This year's optional symposia also were popular. A number of our colleagues gave us a “tour” of International Neuro-Ophthalmology during a session chaired by Christian Lueck and Klara Landau. Mike Strominger led a hands-on workshop on “Prism Therapeutics in Diplopia.” Betty Kovacs from the St. Luke's Weight Loss Center in New York City and Shana McCormick from the University of Pennsylvania gave attendees practical ways to assist our obese patients (adult and pediatric) regarding weight loss. Janet Rucker and David Newman-Toker led the sold-out “Eye Movement and Vestibular Skills” session. In addition, we learned about many new neuro-ophthalmic research directions in both the scientific platform and poster sessions.

This year's awardees were:

James A. Sharpe Award for Best Presentation by a Fellow—Enrique Rivera, “Chronic Optic Neuropathy Causes Decreases in both Inner Retinal Blood Flow and Prelaminar Optic Nerve Blood Flow.”

Best Abstract by a Resident—Eric D. Gaier, “Clinical Features of OPA1-Related Optic Neuropathy: A Focus on Genetic Modifiers.”

Best Abstract by a Student—Sui H. Wong, “Natural History of Ocular Myasthenia Gravis in 101 Cases: Towards a Risk of Generalization (‘ROG’) Score.”

2015 Young Investigator Award—Heather Moss, “The Photopic Negative Response in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.”

2015 Pilot Grant Award—Hong Jiang, “Retinal Microvascular Alteration as a Possible Biomarker in Alzheimer's Disease.”

Hoyt Lecture Award—Mark Kupersmith, “Optical Imaging of the Optic Nerve: Beyond Documenting RNFL Loss.”

Robert Avery, who presented “Hand-Held Optical Coherence Tomography during Sedation Detects Visual Acuity and Visual Field Loss in Young Children with Optic Pathway Gliomas” received the 2013 Young Investigator Award.

The 2015 Thomas Carlow Distinguished Service Award, the highest honor bestowed by NANOS, went to two recipients, Ivy Dreizin (Fig. 2) and Preston Calvert (Fig. 3).

FIG. 2

FIG. 2

FIG. 3

FIG. 3

We had 667 attendees at this year's meeting, which is a record, representing 36 countries. The annual banquet was followed by a marshmallow roast on the beach. Janel Fick and her outstanding staff again hosted a very well-organized meeting. The 42nd meeting will be held in Tucson, Arizona, at the Starr Pass Marriott Resort on February 27–March 3, 2016. Stay tuned!

© 2015 by North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society