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October/December 2018 - Volume 33 - Issue 4
pp: 297-381,E1-E14

Quality From the Field





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Journal: Journal of Nursing Care Quality October/December 2018, Volume 33, Issue 4;
Learn more about this study of 1933 RNs in 24 hospitals with shared leadership and the nurses’ perceptions of their decisional involvement. The author explains the study and its implications for nurses. Be sure to read the article for details about this important study and how you can use the findings in your own health care setting.
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Journal: Journal of Nursing Care Quality October/December 2018, Volume 33, Issue 4;
Achieving optimal compliance for bar code medication administration (BCMA) in mature medication use systems is challenging due to the iterative system refinements over time. The author describes a nursing leadership initiative to increase BCMA compliance, measured as a composite across all hospital units. Compliance increased from 95% to 98%, but most importantly, through this initiative, leadership discovered unanticipated benefits and unintended consequences. The methodology used provides valuable insight into effective strategies for BCMA optimization with applicability for other QI initiatives. After watching the video, learn more about the initiative in the article.
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Journal: Journal of Nursing Care Quality October/December 2018, Volume 33, Issue 4;
Mr. Yokota and his team investigated the effect of using a fall risk screening tool in an EMR by using data for 25 039 patients in 24 general wards at a large health system in Tokyo. The probability of the occurrence of falls decreased after the tool was implemented, but using the tool did not reduce the actual occurrence of falls. The author summarizes the findings in the video and describes the full study in the article.
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Journal: Journal of Nursing Care Quality October/December 2018, Volume 33, Issue 4;
Incomplete or inaccurate triage examination in an emergency department can result in delays, which could compromise patient outcomes. Dr. Johnson discusses the outcomes of her study on triage interruptions and how they affect the triage process. A significant difference was seen in triage duration between interrupted and uninterrupted interviews. Understanding the impact of interruptions on patient outcomes allows nurses and other health care providers to develop interventions to mitigate the impact.