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A0018 Comparing the Pregnancy Outcome in Nuliparas both with and without Microalbuminuria at the end of the second trimester of Pregnancy

Kashanian, Maryam; Bahasadri, Shohreh; Khosravi, Zahra

doi: 10.1097/01.hjh.0000548373.84775.3e
02-CLINICAL SCIENCE: PDF Only
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Objectives: Poor pregnancy outcome and complications during pregnancy such as pre-eclampsia, preterm delivery, preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) and intra uterine growth restriction (IUGR), are very important and the finding of new methods for their prediction has always been a matter of serious concern. The purpose of the present study was toevaluate poor pregnancy outcome in nulliparas who had microalbuminuria at the end of second trimester of their pregnancy.

Methods: A prospective cohort study was performed on 490 nulliparous women who were at the end of the second trimester of pregnancy. Urine tests for albuminuria and creatinine measurements were performed in all women and an albumin creatinine ratio (ACR) was calculated according to milligram per gram. The women with microalbuminuria (exposed group) and without microalbuminuria (unexposed group) were monitored to the end of their pregnancy and compared for pregnancy outcome.

Results: Preterm labor (PTL) [22 (55%) cases VS 61 (14.9%), P = 0.000], preeclampsia [19 (47.5%) cases VS 39 (8.9%), P = 0.000], IUGR [16 (41 %) cases VS 29 (6.6%) cases, P = 0.000] and PPROM [12 (30%) cases VS 46 (10.5%) cases, P = 0.000] showed more in the exposed group. Gestational diabetes did not show significant difference between the 2 groups. Using multivariate logistic regression analyses, microalbominuria showed an increased risk for PTL [Adjusted OR (95% CI) = 2.4 (1.1–5.5), P = 0.03] and preeclampsia [Adjusted OR (95% CI) = 9.5 (4.6–19.3), P = 0.000].

Conclusion: Microalbuminuria at the end of the second trimester of pregnancy may increase the risk of preterm labor, precclampsia, IUGR and PPROM.

Obstetrics & Gynecology Iran University of Medical Sciences Iran

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