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Hypertension and hypothyroidism: results from an ambulatory blood pressure monitoring study

Kotsis, Vasiliosa,b; Alevizaki, Mariaa; Stabouli, Stellac; Pitiriga, Vassilikia; Rizos, Zoed; Sion, Michaelb; Zakopoulos, Nikosa

doi: 10.1097/HJH.0b013e328082e2ff
Original papers: Endocrinology
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Objective To examine differences between hypothyroid patients and healthy volunteers in 24-h ambulatory blood pressure parameters.

Methods The study population consisted of 100 individuals who were recently diagnosed for hypothyroidism. These patients had never been treated before with antihypertensive treatment or received drugs for hypothyroidism. All participants underwent 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The control group consisted of 100 healthy volunteers matched one to one for gender and age with the hypothyroid participants.

Results Clinic systolic and diastolic blood pressures were significantly higher in patients with hypothyroidism compared with volunteers. The mean 24-h systolic blood pressure and 24-h pulse pressure were significantly higher in patients with hypothyroidism compared with volunteers. The 24-h systolic blood pressure variability was also significantly higher in patients with hypothyroidism. Fasting serum cholesterol tended to be higher in patients with hypothyroidism compared with volunteers but the difference was not statistically significant, while fasting serum triglycerides were significantly higher. Body mass index was also significantly higher in patients with hypothyroidism.

Conclusions These findings indicate that hypothyroidism may be an important predictor of higher mean 24-h systolic blood pressure, 24-h pulse pressure and 24-h systolic blood pressure variability, parameters of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring that have been previously associated with higher cardiovascular target organ damage.

aDepartment of Clinical Therapeutics, Alexandra Hospital, National and Kapodestrial University, Athens

b3rd Department of Internal Medicine, Papageorgiou Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki

cDepartment of Paediatrics, National and Kapodestrial University, Athens, Greece

dUniversity of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Received 7 August, 2006

Revised 18 December, 2006

Accepted 3 January, 2007

Correspondence and requests for reprints to Ass. Prof. Vasilios Kotsis, MD, PhD, 4 Viotias Str., Byron, 16232, Athens, Greece Tel: +30 6974748860; fax: +30 2107613600; e-mail: bkotsis@med.uoa.gr

© 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.