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Jackson Frances PhD RN; Schim, Stephanie Myers PhD, RN, CNAA; Seely, Sondra RN; Grunow, Ken MEd, BSN, RN; Baker, Julie MSN, RN
Journal of Hospice & Palliative Nursing: April-May-June 2000
Barriers to Hospice Care for African Americans: Problems and Solutions: PDF Only
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PURPOSE.

To identify barriers to hospice care perceived by African Americans.

SAMPLE.

African-American members (N = 30, 4 males, 19 females) of a metropolitan community in the Midwest.

METHODS.

Four focus groups were conducted, three with community members and one of hospice-experienced members. Responses were content analyzed and coded into barriers.

FINDINGS.

Four barriers were identified: lack of knowledge, hospice perceived as giving up hope, dying at home, second-class care.

CONCLUSIONS

Make hospice presentations to the African-American community, recruit African-American staff/volunteers, support patient decision to choose hospice, identify community resources.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE.

Nurses may be the first to recommend hospice, address barriers frankly with patient/family, and identify resources to support home care.

Frances Jackson, PhD, RN, is an Associate Professor, Oakland University School of Nursing, Rochester, MI. Stephanie Myers Schim, PhD, RN, CNAA, is a Nurse Scholar, Henry Ford Health Systems, Detroit, MI. Sondra Seely, RN, is a Hospice Administrator; Ken Grunow, MEd, BSN, RN, is an Education Coordinator, and Julie Baker, MSN, RN, is a Staff Nurse, Hospices of Henry Ford Health System, St. Clair Shores, MI.

© 2000 The Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association