The Mayo Model of Community Care: Integrating Population Health and Patient Experience Initiatives for Efficient Reform : Journal of Healthcare Management

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POPULATION HEALTH

The Mayo Model of Community Care: Integrating Population Health and Patient Experience Initiatives for Efficient Reform

Kennedy, Denise M.; Nordrum, Jon T. DPT, DSc

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Journal of Healthcare Management 60(2):p 91-95, March 2015.

Abstract

The need for population health management (PHM) in this country has never been greater. Medical advances have improved Americans' longevity, but longer lives are not necessarily healthier lives. Nearly one-half of Americans report at least one lifestyle-related chronic disease (Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease, 2009), and this group accounts for 84% of all healthcare spending (Anderson, 2010). Despite this level of spending, clinical outcomes for this population are poor. The prevalence of lifestyle-related chronic disease is steadily increasing, with the greatest increases occurring in younger individuals (Ford, Croft, Posner, Goodman, & Giles, 2013). As the population ages, the need for complex care coordination and a system to support it will increase. The current system, designed for episodic treatment of acute illness, is incapable of delivering high-value healthcare that meets the needs of the American public (Institute of Medicine, 2001).

Several interrelated concepts contribute to high-value healthcare. Value is enhanced by improving quality—that is, outcomes, safety, and service/patient experience—relative to costs (Smoldt & Cortese, 2007; Porter & Teisberg, 2006). Outcomes are improved with PHM, which includes care coordination, prevention, health and wellness education, and lifestyle changes (Nash, 2012). Service quality and the patient experience are improved with a comprehensive, data-driven approach (Kennedy, Caselli, & Berry, 2011), an emphasis on physician communication (Kennedy, Fasolino, & Gullen, 2014), and promotion of a culture of accountability (Kennedy, Didehban, & Fasolino, 2014). Berwick, Nolen, and Whittington (2008) assert that the Triple Aim goals—improve the patient experience and population health while reducing per capita costs—are interrelated and recommend a broad approach when implementing Affordable Care Act initiatives. Our experience supports this assertion.

© 2015 Foundation of the American College of Healthcare Executives

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