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DEPARTMENTS: Abstracts

Poster Abstracts From 2020 Dermatology Nurses' Association Annual Meeting

Journal of the Dermatology Nurses’ Association: May/June 2020 - Volume 12 - Issue 3 - p 140-141
doi: 10.1097/JDN.0000000000000538
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Stories in Microneedling

Rosanna Bermejo, RN, MBA, Med Aesthetics Miami, LLC. E-mail: info@medaestheticsmiami.com

With the increase in the longevity of the population, people are looking to maintain their juvenile looks to remain competitive in their environment. Noninvasive procedures are, as a result, gaining popularity. Through this study, we share the success that we've had with microneedling procedures, especially when combined with other modalities.

In our methodology, we will be using the techniques suggested by Des Fernandes in his book, as well as those written by Lance Setterfield in his last books. We explain depth of penetration and other factors. Depending on the condition treated, we are able to customize the procedure. Finally, some pictures showing “before and afters” are included as proof of thework.

Physicians' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practicing Patterns Regarding Psychocutaneous Disorders: A Systematic Search and Literature Review

Helen Denise Gipson, FNP-C, Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS. E-mail: dgipson@umc.edu

Vinayak K. Nahar, MD, PhD, Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, and Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine/John D. Bower School of Population Health, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS. E-mail: naharvinayak@gmail.com

Amanda H. Wilkerson, PhD, Department of Human Environmental Sciences, College of Human Environmental Sciences, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL. E-mail: awilkerson@ches.ua.edu

James E. Roberts, MD, Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS. E-mail: jroberts5@umc.edu

Abigail M. Smith, BS, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL. E-mail: abbymcmurry@gmail.com

Vraj Patel, MS, DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine, Lincoln Memorial University, Harrogate, TN. E-mail: patelvraj96@gmail.com

Syed Siraj A. Quadri, PhD, DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine, Lincoln Memorial University, Harrogate, TN. E-mail: patelvraj96@gmail.com

Joshua R. Mann, MD, MPH, Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine/John D. Bower School of Population Health, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS. E-mail: jmann4@umc.edu

Robert T. Brodell, MD, FAAD, Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS. E-mail: rbrodell@umc.edu

BACKGROUND: Many dermatological patients seen in clinics have concomitant psychiatric disorders, with rates as high as 30%–40%. The consequences of failing to address the psychological needs of these patients can be severe because these patients are prone to have depression, perform self-injurious behaviors, or even commit suicide as a result of their dermatological disease.

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practicing patterns among physicians regarding psychodermatology.

METHOD: We conducted electronic searches in four databases: PubMed (Medline), CINAHL, ERIC, and PsycINFO. Our searches were not restricted by study design, date of publication, language, or location. Studies were included if they met the following criteria: (a) original research articles; (b) investigating knowledge, attitudes, and/or practices about psychodermatology; (c) published in peer-reviewed journals; and (d) targeting physicians.

IMPLICATIONS: This review included nine studies conducted from 2009 to 2019. Studies were carried out in the United States (n = 4), Kazakhstan (n = 1), Ukraine (n = 1), the Middle East (n = 1), Turkey (n = 1), and Chile (n = 1). Despite frequent experience with psychodermatology patients, the number of physicians who reported a “clear understanding” of psychodermatology was, on average, 13.75%. Between 31% and 70% of physicians reported never receiving formal training on psychodermatology. The level of comfort dermatologists had in treating psychodermatology patients was most often reported as “neutral,” “somewhat uncomfortable,” or “very uncomfortable.” The dermatologic disorders most commonly referred by dermatologists to psychiatry were delusions of parasitosis, factitious disorder, trichotillomania, and psoriasis. Implications from these findings for nurses will be presented and discussed at the Dermatology Nurses' Association Conference 2020.

Using Patient Education to Achieve Optimal Results With Their Topical Retinoid/Benzoyl Peroxide Therapy

Colleen Vlachos, RN, Henry Ford Medical Group–Dermatology. E-mail: cvlacho1@hfhs.org

Jessica Hutchings, RN, Henry Ford Medical Group–Dermatology. E-mail: jhutchi3@hfhs.org

BACKGROUND: In our clinical practice, it was found that our nursing staff did not know the evidence-based rationale for administration times related to topical retinoids (specifically tretinoin and adapalene) and benzoyl peroxide for the treatment of acne. Our nursing staff fields phone calls and questions from patients regarding their treatment plans and has a significant impact on their adherence to these plans.

PURPOSE: Upon discovering this knowledge gap, a literature review was completed to provide data to our nursing staff to ensure that they are able to share the evidence-based rationale with patients and improve their adherence to their treatment plan.

METHODS: Literature review was used.

IMPLICATIONS: Teaching the nursing staff was essential to ensure that each of our nurses is sharing evidence-based knowledge with the patients when they call with questions about their treatment plans. Our nurses can now more confidently explain the purpose for the timing of the patient's medications, and the patients are more likely to adhere to their regimen as prescribed and achieve better outcomes in the treatment of their acne.

Best Practice to Describe Fecal Stomas and Peristomal Skin for Continuity of Care

Sandra Oehlke, APRN, CPNP-PC, CWOCN, DCNP, CCM, CCRP, Metropolitan State University, Oakdale, MN. E-mail: saoehlke@gmail.com

BACKGROUND: It is documented in the literature that patients with fecal stomas require ongoing care by various caregivers and other healthcare providers. There is currently a deficit in the ability for caregivers to describe fecal stomas and peristomal skin. A detailed and correct description of the patient's stoma and peristomal skin is needed to facilitate the caregivers' ability to monitor the stoma and peristomal skin health.

PURPOSE: The purpose of this educational poster is to provide the attendee with visual examples of stomas and peristomal skin to use as a reference when documenting patients' fecal stomas and peristomal skin. This will facilitate continuity of care for patients with fecal stomas.

METHOD: Photos of normal stomas, retracted stomas, and peristomal skin findings will be provided with a quiz format and answers on the poster on how to describe the findings. Descriptions will be provided for attendees to review. The will get immediate feedback by seeing the answer on the poster. Engaging the attendee in an interactive way will promote learning and retention.

IMPLICATIONS: Attendees will enjoy an interactive learning opportunity to learn how to describe fecal stomas and peristomal skin findings to promote optimal care of patients with fecal stomas.

It's Not an Allergy!

Sandra Oehlke, APRN, CPNP-PC, CWOCN, DCNP, CCM, CCRP, Metropolitan State University, Oakdale, MN. E-mail: saoehlke@gmail.com

BACKGROUND: Patients experience multiple peristomal complications that can be managed with correct diagnosis and correct pouch and pouch application. All too often, peristomal skin conditions are diagnosed incorrectly as an allergy to the pouch. When a patient's peristomal skin condition is diagnosed as an allergy in error, the true diagnosis or problem is not addressed. In addition, the patient will throw away expensive pouches and buy new products that may not be covered by insurance that causes frustration and impairs the quality of life for a patient with a stoma.

PURPOSE: The purpose of this poster is to provide education for dermatology nurses and nurse practitioners on the differential diagnosis of peristomal skin conditions that are confused for an allergy. Patch testing example will be provided to educate the viewer on how to determine if the patient is indeed reacting to the pouch or barrier to educate the patient, caregiver, or parent.

METHODS: Photos of peristomal skin conditions such as irritant contact dermatitis from effluent, candida dermatitis, will be provided with a clinical description and treatment recommendations. Patch testing example will be provided as well.

IMPLICATIONS: Identifying the correct peristomal skin condition and providing correct treatment are imperative to provide patients who require ostomy pouches to manage their effluent with optimal quality of life.

Copyright © 2020 by the Dermatology Nurses' Association.