Introduction of Spring-Assisted Cranioplasty for Sagittal Craniosynostosis in a Craniofacial Service: A Report of Early Experience : Journal of Craniofacial Surgery

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Introduction of Spring-Assisted Cranioplasty for Sagittal Craniosynostosis in a Craniofacial Service: A Report of Early Experience

Bakri, Sherif MD, FEBOPRAS*; Mazeed, Ahmed S. MD, FEBOPRAS*; Saied, Samia MD*; Abdelhamied, Ahmed Kamal MD; Kenawy, Karam MD; Aly, Haitham M. MD; Ahmed, Islam Mokhtar MD; Sadek, Abdelrahim Abdrabou MD§; Othman, Amr Ahmed MD§; Kolby, Lars MD, PhD; Elsherbiny, Ahmed MD*

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The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery 34(3):p 899-903, May 2023. | DOI: 10.1097/SCS.0000000000009065

Abstract

Spring-assisted cranioplasty (SAC) for the treatment of craniosynostosis uses internal springs to produce dynamic changes in cranial shape over several months before its removal. The purpose of this study was to report the first Egyptian experiences with SAC in the treatment of children with sagittal synostosis and evaluate the preliminary outcome. A total of 17 consecutive patients with scaphocephaly underwent SAC with a midline osteotomy along the fused sagittal suture and insertion of 3 springs with bayonet-shaped ends across the opened suture. Operative time, blood transfusion requirements and length of ICU, total hospital stay, and complications graded according to Oxford protocol classification were recorded. Spring removal was performed once re-ossification of the cranial defect occurred. All patients successfully underwent SAC without significant complications. The mean age at surgery was 6.8 months. The mean time of the spring insertion surgery was 63 minutes (SD 9.7). Blood transfusion was needed in less than half of the patients (41.2%).The mean duration of hospital stay was 3.2 days. The mean timing of spring removal was 5.5 months (SD 0.4). The mean time of the second surgery (spring removal) was 22.8 minutes (SD 3.6). In conclusion, SAC can easily be incorporated into the treatment armamentarium of craniofacial surgeons. The technique offers a safe and minimally invasive option for the treatment of sagittal craniosynostosis with the benefit of limited dural undermining, minimal blood loss, operative time, anesthetic time, ICU stay, and hospital stay.

Copyright © 2022 by Mutaz B. Habal, MD

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